2017–18 Departmental Results Report – Supplementary Information Tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Context for the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

The 2016–2019 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS):

In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) supports reporting on the implementation of the FSDS and its Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy, or equivalent document, through the activities described in this supplementary information table.

2. Sustainable Development in ISED

ISED's Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy for 2017 to 2020 describes the department's actions in support of achieving clean growth, effective action on climate change, low carbon government, clean energy, sustainable managed lands and forests, sustainable food, and safe and healthy communities. This supplementary information table presents available results for the departmental actions pertinent to these goals. Last year's supplementary information table is posted on the department's website. This year, ISED is also noting which UN Sustainable Development Goal target each departmental action contributes to achieving.

3. Departmental performance by FSDS goal

The following tables provide performance information on departmental actions in support of the FSDS goals listed in section 2.

FSDS goal: clean growth

Canada has already made significant progress on its Mission Innovation objectives. In 2015–16, the first year of Mission Innovation, Canada increased energy research, development and demonstration (RD&D) funding by 24% relative to the previous year, for a total investment of $476M. Investments announced in Budget 2017 further increased energy RD&D funding, including:

FSDS goal: clean growth
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Invest in technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Establish a Clean Growth Hub.

SDG 9

Starting Point:

New program established in 2018.

Target Indicator:

Engagement, collaboration, and consultation activities

Publications of policy intelligence, program analytics and other materials in support of evidence-based decision-making

Active GoC departmental Clean Technology program websites linked to the Hub clean technology program inventory

Unique page views

Users satisfied they were able to access information they were seeking from the website

Participating (in the Hub) federal departments and agencies indicating that clean tech priorities are more aligned than they were before the Hub

Clean Technology program components noting more efficient access to federal clean technology programming

Clean Technology programs that track technology advancement through the Hub using a technology readiness scale

In January 2018, the Clean Growth Hub was officially launched as the Government of Canada's focal point for clean technology support in partnership with Natural Resources Canada and in conjunction with other federal departments and agencies. From pre-launch to March 2018 the Hub helped 234 clean technology users and producers identify federal programs and supports most relevant to their needs.

The Hub led or helped coordinate and participated in strategic stakeholder engagement events between January and March 2018, including the Government of Canada "Canada Pavilion" at GLOBE 2018 and the Low Carbon Economy Fund Challenge roadshow 2018 across Canada to answer questions related to the Challenge and other climate change and clean technology funding programs.

Between January and March 2018 the Hub website had 7,491 unique page views.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Invest in technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Implement the new Strategic Innovation Fund which retools existing direct business innovation programs which have been part of the SD Strategy in the past: the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative, the Technology Demonstration Program, the Automotive Innovation Fund and the Automotive Supplier Innovation Program.

SDG 9

Starting point:

Government investments in energy R&D: $387M
(2014–15)

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

Percentage of projects demonstrating environmental benefits to Canada (e.g. increase in energy efficiency, conservation of renewable and non-renewable natural resources, increase in production efficiencies and/or reduce material usage).

For SIF projects, the department will be sending out an annual benefits report template to SIF recipients by the end of December 2018 in order to receive all reports and consolidate results by the end of 2018–19. This is the first year that SIF will be asking for results from recipients as enough time has passed for results to materialize.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Invest in technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Support projects across Canada to develop and demonstrate new clean technologies that promote sustainable development, including those that address environmental issues such as climate change, air quality, clean water and clean soil through Sustainable Development Technology Canada's (SDTC) SD Tech Fund.

Implement the SD Tech Fund, which invests in the pre-commercial development and demonstration of clean technology innovation that addresses climate change, air quality, clean water and clean soil. See www.sdtec.ca.

SDG 9

Starting point:

Average of 20 projects approved and contracted per year over past 5 years.

Average of 80% of projects completed within five years.

6.3 megatonnes of CO2e emissions reductions in 2015 attributable to SD Tech Fund supported technologies.

20 SDTC projects per year on average between 2011 and 2015

75% of SDTC funded projects' Technical Readiness Level (TRL) of contracted projects increased by 2 levels

2 dollars leveraged by private and other public funders per dollar from the SD Tech Fund

Revenues of $1.4 billion in 2015 for SDTC-funded technologies

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

80 SDTC projects

75% of SDTC funded projects' TRL of contracted projects increased by 2 levels

Revenue growth from SDTC funded technologies reported by companies entering the global market

Incremental reductions in GHG emissions attributable to SDTC-funded projects: Increase of 1 megatonne reduction per annum through 2025

Maintain current level of approving and contracting 20 projects per year

Average of 85% of projects completing within five years

SDTC approved 24 new projects in 2017–18.

SDTC has an overall average of 88% of projects completing within five years.

SDTC project technologies in the market had an annual GHG emission reduction of 13.8 megatonnes of CO2e in 2017–18. This is an increase of 2.7 megatonnes over the previous year.

87% of SDTC projects completed by 2017–18 achieved a TRL increase of at least two levels.

SDTC projects included an average of $2.40 of leveraged funding for every dollar of SDTC funding.

SDTC projects in the market realized funded project technology related revenues of $2.7 billion in 2017–18.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Invest in technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Continue to implement the National Research Council's Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) on Clean Technology

SDG 9

Performance indicator(s):

Client growth

Number of new products and processes

Economic impact, e.g. program return on investment

Over fiscal years 2016–17 and 2017–18, IRAP has funded 1,068 clean tech projects.

These clean tech projects represent 18% of all IRAP projects started in the same period.

Overall revenue growth of all IRAP-funded firms is 25% (reported in 2017–18).

Overall employment growth of all IRAP-funded firms is 13% (reported in 2017–18).

2017 IRAP evaluation demonstrated positive economic benefits that far outweighed the cost of the program at almost 5 to 1.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Work with partners on developing and adopting new technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Implement Innovation Superclusters Initiative (ISI), a new program which aims to invest in the research, development and commercialization of innovative platform technologies and business processes that will have the potential to improve productivity and competitiveness.

SDG 9

Performance indicator(s):

Number of collaborative projects funded or launched

Increased expenditures on BERD (Business Expenditures on Research and Development)

On February 15, 2018, the Government of Canada announced five Superclusters: Ocean (based in Atlantic Canada), SCALE.AI (based in Quebec), Advanced Manufacturing (Based in Ontario), Protein Industries (based in the Prairies), and digital technology (based in British Columbia).

Contribution Agreements will be signed with superclusters in fall 2018. Project selection processes will be launched subsequently.

Once projects have been selected, superclusters will be asked to identify any that contribute to sustainability.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Work with partners on developing and adopting new technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Implement Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC), a new innovation procurement program which will develop a domestic market for early-stage, pre-commercial innovations

SDG 9

Starting Point:

New program launched in December 2017.

ISC will support the federal government to act as a first customer—to test and validate Canadian technologies, including those related to clean technology that support sustainable growth.

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

ISC will encourage participating federal departments to consider posting challenges that promote clean technology development.

ISC will track the outcomes of clean technology challenges that pass through the program and will report on their outcomes.

The ISC Secretariat is working to help identify and articulate challenge topics, which could include themes related to clean tech and sustainable growth.

The Secretariat attended and promoted the program to clean tech companies at GLOBE 2018.

The program has also launched a dedicated space on the ISC website that enables any business, organization or individual to suggest challenge topics to federal departments and agencies. Topics could include clean tech development.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Work with partners on developing and adopting new technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Continue to Implement FedDev Ontario's core program, the Southern Ontario Prosperity Program (SOPP), which includes the following:

Advanced Manufacturing Fund (AMF),

Investing in Business Innovation (IBI),

Investing in Business Growth and Productivity (IBGP),

Investing in Commercialization Partnerships (ICP),

Investing in Regional Diversification (IRD), and Eastern Ontario Development Program (EOPD).

The Agency will also continue its delivery of national programs and initiatives, such as the Community Futures Program, in southern Ontario.

SDG 9

Starting point:

Further to the Budget 2016 announcement that regional development agencies (RDAs) will increase their collective annual support for clean technology to $100 million, FedDev Ontario invested $25 million in clean technology projects in 2016–17. The Agency is on track to invest approximately $22 million annually in 2017–18 and 2018–19 in clean technology products, processes and services that improve environmental performance in support of sustainable development and clean economic growth

Performance Indicators:

Number and value of FedDev Ontario investments in clean technology projects in southern Ontario

Clean technology employment

FedDev Ontario has made significant investments and leveraged funding from other sources. The funding has targeted a range of existing and emerging economic clusters including manufacturing (associated with 60% of approved FedDev Ontario contributions, of which 37% could be categorized as advanced manufacturing), health care and biotech (26%), information and communications technology (ICT) (13%), agri-food (8%) and clean tech and clean resources (7%).

The activities supported under the Southern Ontario Prosperity Program (SOPP) have directly contributed to the Agency's core mandate of strengthening southern Ontario's economic capacity for innovation, entrepreneurship and collaboration and promoting development of a strong and diversified southern Ontario economy.

Some of the projects include: helping advance aerodynamic testing and the development of more energy-efficient vehicles, creating durable light-weight steel to meet the demands of the automotive companies for emissions reduction as well as safety, and supporting sustainable construction solutions.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Work with partners on developing and adopting new technologies to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Create two additional Canada Excellence Research Chairs (CERC) in fields related to clean and sustainable technology

SDG 9

Starting point:

CERC starting point—0

Performance indicator(s):

Number of clean technology CERCs appointed by October 2020

Phase I results of the ongoing CERC competition resulted in 11 proposals of research programs being invited to participate in Phase II, whereby institutions recruit and nominate researchers for the 11 available chair positions. Three of the 11 proposals are in fields related to clean and sustainable technologies.

Results of Phase II are anticipated to be announced in March 2019, with Chairs to begin their terms between April 2019 and October 2020.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Support voluntary action to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Continue to implement the Expedited Examination of Patent Applications Related to Green Technology through the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO)

SDG 9

Starting point:

From March 3, 2011 to March 31, 2017, 349 patent applications received designation under this legislation and 262 patents were granted.

In 2016–17, 58 patent applications received the designation and 48 patents were granted.

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

As this is a responsive program, there are no targets or performance measures associated with Green Technology for CIPO.

A performance indicator is the number of patents that received designation.

In 2017–18, 77 patent applications received the designation and 64 patents were granted.

Since the Expedited Examination of Patent Applications Related to Green Technology service offering was established in 2011, there has been a steady increase in the number of applicants filing patents at CIPO benefiting from this acceleration mechanism.

Considering the noticeable growth in the Canadian clean technology sector in recent years, one can expect that the number of applications will continue to increase.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Support voluntary action to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Continue to Implement FedNor's Northern Ontario Development Program‎

SDG 9

Starting point:

Through the Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP), FedNor has invested $2.1 million in support of 14 clean tech projects since 2011–12.

Further to Budget 2016 announcement that regional development agencies (RDAs) will increase their annual support for clean technology to $100M, the NODP has expended $401,094 in support of 4 clean tech projects in 2016–17.

Performance indicator(s):

Number and value of FedDev NOR investments in clean technology projects.

Clean technology employment

The NODP expended $401,094 towards 4 clean tech projects in 2016–17 and $2,989,437 towards 5 clean tech projects in 2017–18.

Two projects noted above have been completed with final results of 1.15 full-time equivalent (FTE) jobs created and 1.15 FTE jobs maintained. The other projects are not yet complete with anticipated results of 27.5 FTE jobs created and another 29.2 FTE jobs maintained.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Support voluntary action to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Continue to implement the Computers for Schools Program.

SDG 9

Starting Point:

Number of refurbished computers distributed 74,896 (2016–17)

Target Indicator: number of refurbished computers distributed 81,965 (2017–18)

Amount of toxic waste diverted from landfill: 2.5 million pounds (2016–17)

Number of computers distributed: 74,896 (2016–17)

Number of partner organizations receiving computers: 3,364 (2016–17)

Number of refurbished computers distributed: 76,653 (2017–18)

Target Indicator: number of refurbished computers distributed 90,422
(2018-19)

Amount of toxic waste diverted from landfill: 1.5 million* pounds (2017–18)

Number of partner organizations receiving computers: 3,364
(2017–18)

*Note: Evolution of IT equipment has led to smaller, lighter weight devices which have led to a reduction in tonnes, but not in numbers.

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Support voluntary action to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions

Continue to support the creation of green jobs, the Technical Work Experience Program (TWEP) as part of the Youth Employment Strategy (YES)

SDG 9

Starting point:

Number of green jobs created (TWEP 2016–17) 270

Performance Indicator:

Number of new green jobs created

Number of green jobs created (TWEP 2017–18) 262

Implement our Mission Innovation commitment to double federal government investments in clean energy research, development and demonstration, by 2020, from 2015 levels.

Strengthen skills development in support of the transition to a low-carbon economy

Implement the Youth Employment Strategy through the National Research Council's Industrial Research Assistance Program

SDG 9

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

Youth Employment Program (YEP) Target: $5,000,000

YEP – Green Target: $10,000,000; 1,000 Jobs

796 Youth Jobs supported in 2017–18.

93% of youth employed or self-employed at the end of the internship.

$10,942,035 Total Youth Contribution Expenditures in 2017–18.

1,344 Youth Green Jobs Supported in 2017–18.

67% of youth (Green Jobs) employed or self-employed at the end of the internship.

$11,554,256 Total Youth Green Contribution Expenditures in 2017–18.

Additional departmental sustainable development activities and initiatives related to clean growth
Additional departmental activities and initiatives Starting points, targets and performance indicators Results achieved

Establish a Clean Technology Data Strategy in order to foster innovation, improve knowledge in the private sector and stakeholder communities, and help inform future government decision-making.

Performance Indicators:

Data from the Survey on Environmental Goods and Services (SEGS) pilot (reference year 2015) available to the public

Clean Technology Satellite Account (CTSA) dataset (reference year 2014), and the baseline clean technology macroeconomic indicators generated from this dataset (e.g. GDP, employment, income, trade) available to the public

CTSA dataset (reference years 2015 and 2016) and the baseline clean technology macroeconomic indicators generated from this dataset (e.g. GDP, employment, income, trade) available to the public

Industry and administrative data sets aligned with Statistics Canada's statistical framework

Government departments using SEGS, CTSA and industry/administrative clean technology sector data and/or renewable energy data in their reporting

Frequency of SEGS, CTSA, industry/administrative and/or renewable energy data citations in government reports, speeches, etc.

Frequency of SEGS, CTSA, industry and/or renewable energy data in industry association and think tank reports

Government departments using clean technology data in their reporting

Clean technology data citations in reports by governments, industry association and think tank

The Clean Technology Data Strategy (CTDS) is composed of three components.

Statistics Canada is leading the authoritative data component of the CTDS. In December 2017, Statistics Canada released data from the Environmental and Clean Technology Products Economic Account (formerly known as the Clean Technology Satellite Account). The economic account provides data on the contribution of clean technology to the economy. To measure the growth of Canada's clean technology, the contribution of clean technology to GDP is tracked, as well as the number of jobs related to clean technology. According to the Environmental and Clean Technology Products Economic Account, in 2016, environmental and clean technology accounted for 1.4% ($26.7 billion) of Canada's GDP. Clean technology activity also accounted for approximately 178,000 jobs (2016) or just under 1% of jobs in Canada. Clean technology exports totaled $7.8 billion in 2016, up 43% from 2007 levels.

The Clean Growth Hub is co-leading the administrative data component of the CTDS. Between January and April 2018 the Hub initiated a scan of metrics being collected by innovation and clean technology programs across the federal government to inform the development of standards and guidelines for program data collection.

Continue to implement the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund (PSI-SIF) which aims at improving environmental sustainability (SDG 13) of research and innovation related infrastructure at post-secondary institutions and college training infrastructure (SDG 4). PSI-SIF provides up to $2 billion for infrastructure projects at post-secondary institutions to enhance and modernize research and commercialization facilities, as well as industry-relevant training facilities at colleges and polytechnic institutions in Canada. The entire program budget has been allocated at this time. PSI-SIF is working collaboratively with the provincial and territorial jurisdictions to have the approved projects substantially completed by April 30, 2018.

Performance indicator(s):

Number of projects certified under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) and at what level.

Description and estimate of direct energy savings as a result of renovation, repair and maintenance projects.

Description and estimate of greenhouse gas emissions reductions in the following areas as a result of renovation, repair and maintenance projects:

Direct emissions reductions from equipment upgrades

Indirect emissions reductions associated with generation of electricity

The sustainable development results associated with the PSI-SIF program are not available at this time. Data will be compiled once all the projects have been completed.

Continue to support and promote the integration of corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies and practices into the operations, core business strategies, and global supply chains of Canadian businesses; corporate accountability and transparency practices; and, CSR standards in the Canadian marketplace. The integration of CSR practices can make a positive contribution to the realization of sustainable consumption and production (SDG 12), innovation (SDG 9) and competitiveness.

Number of firms in Canada that have a green/sustainability strategy in place.

Number of Canadian firms producing CSR reports using the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Standard.

ISED is reviewing its data collection practices with respect to the integration of CSR standards in the Canadian marketplace and will report on progress in 2018–19.

Continue to implement the Prime Minister Awards (PMA) which advances goal on ensuring a quality education for all (SDG 4). The Prime Minister's Awards program honours Canada's pre-eminent ICT teachers and early childhood educators every year through a national competition. The nomination criteria honours educators who encourage youth to become conscious global citizens and to critically consider real world issues. The program promotes and shares the PMA recipient's exemplary teaching practices in order to replicate excellence in education across the country and help students develop skills needed to excel in a 21st century society and economy.

Number of PMA recipients that teach in areas related to the environment, climate change and clean growth.

52 educators honored and recognized as PMA Recipients in 2017–18.

16 National PMA Recipient best practices shared and promoted in 2017–18.

FSDS goal: effective action on climate change
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved

By 2030, reduce Canada's total GHG emissions by 30%, relative to 2005 emission levels

Work with partners on climate change

The Standards Council of Canada, a crown corporation member of the ISED portfolio, will continue to work with partners to develop standards for infrastructure to adapt to the effects of climate change.

SDG 9

Starting point:

5 National Standards of Canada developed as of March 2018

Completed an inventory of infrastructure standards

Short Term Targets
(2017–18):

Develop 2 new Climate Change standards focusing on extreme precipitation

Update 2 Critical Infrastructure standards

Develop 2 new Northern Infrastructure standards

Progress achieved on short term targets:

Development initiated on one new climate change standard and one updated technical guide, focusing on extreme precipitation.

Updates to two critical infrastructure standards underway, and three seed documents completed to support future standards.

Development initiated on three new Northern Infrastructure standards and one updated technical guide.

By 2030, reduce Canada's total GHG emissions by 30%, relative to 2005 emission levels

Support voluntary action to reduce GHG emissions and adapt to climate change

Support development of Building Codes for effective action on climate change adaptation and resilience.

SDG 9

Performance targets for the Energy Code will be a tiered reduction in 2020 to a Net Zero energy consumption by 2025 for new buildings and homes in provinces that adopt the new Codes.

The Committees responsible for the National Energy Code for Buildings continue to develop technical changes to improve energy efficiency for buildings. Next Code edition will be published in 2020. While the objective is not GHG reduction, the reduction in energy consumption will contribute to GHG reduction.

Additional departmental sustainable development activities and initiatives related to effective action on climate change
Additional departmental activities and initiatives Starting points, targets and performance indicators Results achieved

Canada's co-operative sector has a track record of success in providing social, economic and environmental benefits to Canadians. While government programming does not target co-operatives directly, it aims to ensure that co-operatives have equitable access to business supports, and are well-positioned to contribute to economic, social and environmental needs in Canadian communities. As such, the ISED portfolio provides a range of programs and services that support co-ops through start-up, growth and expansion.

ISED will continue to advance environmental sustainability through support to co-operatives including those with socio-economic and environmental benefits. This will include identifying and addressing opportunities related to co-operatives and more broadly social innovation. The growth of the co-operative sector across Canada has the potential to have a positive impact on all of the environmental goals of the FSDS, including effective action on climate change and advancing clean growth. Additionally, support to co-operatives will support Canada's progress on SDG 8 (inclusive and sustainable economic growth and decent work for all), and SDG 13 on effective action on climate change.

Starting point:

In 2016, there were a total of 7,791 non-financial co-operatives in Canada. Of that, there are an estimated 89 active Renewable Energy Co-operatives across Canada.

In April 2018, ISED launched a consultation process for federal, provincial and territorial governments and the Canadian co-operative sector to explore how to open programs and services; raise the awareness of co-operatives; and, modernize data collections. The consultation is also collecting information on emerging opportunities, which includes clean tech and renewable energy.

ISED continues to support co-operatives, which are well positioned to contribute to economic, social and environmental needs in Canadian communities:

  • In October 2018, the Growth Through Regional Innovation Program terms and conditions for the Business Scale-up and Productivity Stream and the Regional Innovation Ecosystem Stream were approved, which includes co-operatives as eligible applicants.
  • Women Entrepreneurship Strategy's Ecosystem Fund ($85 million investment over five years), includes co-operatives in the eligibility.
  • The 2017 Survey on Financing and Growth of SMEs, includes co-operatives to increase the awareness and understanding of co-operative financing and growth in Canada. Survey data will be available in fall 2018.

In 2017, there were a total of 7,819 incorporated non-financial co-operatives in Canada. Of that, there were an estimated 90 incorporated renewable energy cooperatives across Canada.

Promote sustainable consumption practices by continuing to work with key partners to ensure that consumers have the information and tools needed to protect their interests. This relates to SDG 12 on sustainable consumption and production.

Starting point:

Data is available starting in 2014–15 on a yearly basis.

Performance indicator:

Number of visitors accessing consumer information on sustainable consumption on Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada's website and other websites ISED maintains.

Through the Office of Consumer Affairs (OCA) website, ISED hosted content on its websites encouraging consumers to use sustainable consumption practices. Popular topics included tips for green living, e-waste, product disposal and environmental labels/claims which accounted for 2% of OCA web visits.

FSDS goal: low carbon government
FSDS target(s) FSDS contributing action(s) Corresponding departmental action(s) Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions Results achieved

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings / operations

The Communications Research Centre (CRC), as the steward of the Shirley's Bay Campus, has undertaken a number of health and safety upgrades to campus infrastructure, which include efforts to "green" campus operations, such as:

Reducing energy usage with the installation of energy efficient LED lighting and motion sensors;

Migrating off a central heating plant in favour of energy efficient stand-alone units for each building;

Procuring an advanced software suite that monitors and manages energy usage;

Reducing building footprint by 37%

Eliminating nonessential equipment and replacing aging infrastructure.

SDG 9

Data from previous years are unavailable. Measures will be taken to begin tracking for reporting on FY 2017–18.

With regard to the tracking of energy use measures for reporting on FY 2017–18, the tracking process is complete and has been implemented.

With regard to the health and safety upgrades to campus infrastructure specific to "greening" campus operations, all commitments were completed by March 31, 2018, as noted below:

Completed the reduction of energy usage with the installation of energy efficient LED lighting and motion sensors;

All CRC assets, with the exception of two buildings to be transferred to the Department of National Defence as part of the longer-term transfer of Campus Stewardship, have been migrated off the central heating plant and are now using energy efficient stand-alone units;

The ION and Building Automation Systems (BAS) have been put in place to monitor and manage energy usage;

On track with the reduction of the building footprint. The only remaining action items are specific building transfers;

Nonessential equipment was successfully eliminated and the building infrastructure replacement is complete.

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

Modernize our fleet

While supporting Canada's commercial automotive sector, support the reduction of carbon intensity generated from ISED's motor vehicles by continuing to enforce the department's mandatory right sizing exercise, rationalization and leveraging new technology where possible; purchasing more low-emission vehicle options, including zero-emission vehicles, where operationally appropriate; and aligning with government-wide efforts on zero-emission vehicle targets for future fleet acquisitions.

SDG 9

Starting point:

ISED fleet emissions reported in the baseline year 2005–06 are 1.911 kt CO2e.

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2030 ISED will reduce its Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHGs) from its motor vehicle fleet by 40% below 2005 baseline.

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2018 ISED will implement mandatory oversight of vehicle planning and acquisition prior to vehicle selection and purchase execution.

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2019 ISED will analyze its fleet operations and examine if there are opportunities to reduce the fleet size through pooling / sharing of vehicles between Sectors to determine if new requirements can be satisfied with existing fleet, (further rationalization).

Performance Indicator: Starting in 2019–20, 100% of ISED's new light-duty administrative fleet purchases will be zero-emission vehicles (where vehicles are available and where operational needs permit). Where ZEVs are not available or suitable for operational needs, new light-duty administrative fleet purchases will be the lower-emissions option. ISED will also examine if there are opportunities to broaden this approach to other ISED fleet purchases.

ISED exceeded the target for GHG reductions. The GHG emissions results achieved for fiscal year 2017–18 is 1.079 kilotonnes of CO2 equivalent. Percentage change in GHG emissions from fiscal year 2005–06 to the 2017–18 fiscal year is: −43.54%.

ISED has fully implemented the mandatory oversight indicator. The department must direct all Vehicle Acquisition Form to the Materiel Management Section to vet the vehicle requirement.

ISED is on track to meet the fleet size pooling / sharing target.

To date ISED has begun to implement the ZEV target. ISED has acquired two light duty vehicles that are zero emissions capable, specifically Plug-In-Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV's). Two more will be delivered late November early December 2018.

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement

Promote environmental sustainability by launching the Procurement Process Modernization Initiative. ISED will take action to automate the department's procurement and accounts payable process.

SDG 12.7

Starting Point:

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2018, ISED will develop the Financial Signature Approval (FSA) Automation and workflow portal.

Performance Indicators: By March 31, 2019, ISED will develop the Accounts Payable Invoice and Procurement Automation.

Performance Indicators: By March 31, 2020, ISED will implement the modernized procurement to payment tool.

Starting Point:

Since 2014-15, ISED established environmental SMART targets for Audio Visual Equipment, Vehicles, Computers and Monitors. ISED will continue to leverage common use of procurement instruments where available and feasible.

Since 2014–15, ISED has implemented mandatory green procurement training for procurement and materiel management specialists.

ISED will take action to ensure 100% of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management will have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course, or equivalent, in the given fiscal year.

Since 2014–15 ISED has included environmental considerations in performance management agreements (PMAs) for managers and functional heads.

ISED will take action to ensure 100% of managers and functional heads in procurement and materiel include environmental considerations in their PMAs.

The automation of the FSA was developed in the spring of 2018. The FSA Automation is currently being tested. Training material is being created and a general release into the production environment is scheduled to be completed by January 2019.

Ongoing, ISED continues to make use of the procurement instruments established by Public Services and Procurement Canada.

Ongoing, 100% of procurement specialist in procurement and materiel management must complete the green procurement training.

Ongoing, 100% of managers and functional heads in procurement and materiel management include environmental considerations in their PMA.

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

Demonstrate innovative technologies

Utilize the new Innovative Solutions Canada (ISC) program as an avenue for Government departments to issue challenges around developing a novel technology or service that reduces greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets.

SDG 9

Performance Indicators:

Number of challenge statements developed by ISED

Number of proposals evaluated

Number of new innovative technologies demonstrated

The ISC Secretariat helps identify and articulate challenge topics, which could include themes related to reducing GHG emissions from federal buildings.

The program has also launched a dedicated space on the ISC website that enables any business, organization or individual to suggest challenge topics to federal departments and agencies. Topics could include reducing GHG emissions.

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

Understand climate change impacts and build resilience

Use the integrated planning and reporting process to ensure programs consider climate change impacts in their planning.

Where appropriate, integrate climate change considerations into ISED's corporate risk profile and investment plan (both documents are part of the annual Corporate Plan).

Ensure service disruptions are avoided by incorporating climate change considerations and adaptation measures into business continuity planning.

SDG 9

Where appropriate, the Corporate Plan (which includes the investment plan and corporate risk profile) incorporates consideration of climate change mitigation and adaptation measures

Business continuity plans integrate considerations of climate change mitigation and adaptation.

No update.

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

Improve transparency and accountability

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025

Develop policy for low-carbon government

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Not applicable.

Additional departmental sustainable development activities and initiatives related to low carbon government
Additional departmental activities and initiatives Starting points, targets and performance indicators Results achieved

Project Re-Use Reduce Recycle: Take action to expand the Project Re-Use program across the department where feasible.

Starting point(s): Since 2015, ISED implemented Project Re-Use Reduce Recycle in in one facility.

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2018, ISED will conduct a surplus analysis of all major centres across the department; and establish a process where Asset Management is notified of facility closures, moves, retrofits and construction projects.

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2019, ISED will implement Project Re-Use in at least one other facility.

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2020, ISED will implement Project Re-Use in one additional facility.

A feasibility study of all major centres across the department was conducted to determine if and where the re-use project could be implemented.

This study concluded that it was not feasible to notify Asset Management on all closures and construction projects across the department; however it was possible to notify them of employee moves that resulted from retrofits and inner office moves.

As such, a process to track those particular requests between the 235 Queen Street Facilities Team and Asset Management is being implemented in 2018–19.

eLearning: Take action to implement a modernized eLearning tool into the workplace environment in order to reduce the need for travel to training venues and therefore also reduce GHG emissions.

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2018, ISED will introduce and pilot the eLearning concept and develop 1 eLearning product.

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2019, ISED will develop 1 additional eLearning products

Performance Indicator: By March 31, 2020, ISED will develop 1 additional eLearning products.

The objective for March 31, 2018 (Year 1) was met with the release of an eLearning training course on Delegated Financial Authorities. The course became available to users in both official languages in fall 2017 and can be accessed on ISED's Corporate Finance Intranet. In addition, ISED also developed two other products: an informative eLearning on Mental Health as well as an informative eLearning on Talent Management.

ISED leads a GConnex group, Public Servants Promoting a Greener Environment, that is open to federal government employees. The GCConnex group serves as a platform for interdepartmental colleagues to share ideas, discuss and collaborate on activities, best practices and initiatives that promote a greener environment and support sustainable workplace operations.

 

The GCconnex group Public Servants Promoting a Greener Environment led by ISED has grown, reaching a total of 5,872 members (as of October 2018). The group is a collaborative platform aimed at promoting thoughtful and active discussions, sharing files, events, articles and conversations on greening and sustaining topics such as: Waste reduction, recycling, sustainable development, greening initiatives, and recognition for public servants promoting a greener government. This group is an open group and it ranks in 5th place of the most popular groups on GCconnex since 2013.

Video Conferencing: ISED has implemented a video conference solution in 12 regional offices across Canada and 6 sites in the NCR. The service allows employees to host/participate in meetings with their peers and also collaborate on projects without having to travel from site to site.

More NCR and regional sites (up to 9 sites) are being considered for new VC installation

ISED has implemented a video conference solution in 41 regional offices across and 6 sites in NCR. ISED has also implemented Surface Hubs with Skype for Business in 9 regional offices across Canada and 4 sites in NCR.

These services allow employees to host/participate in meetings with their peers and also collaborate on projects without having to travel from site to site.

FSDS goal: clean energy
FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target

Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions

Results achieved

By 2025, contribute to the North American goal of 50% clean power generation

Invest in clean energy technologies

Support voluntary action to reduce GHG and air pollutant emissions through clean energy generation and consumption

Support the development of technologies through SD Tech Fund that:

Enable the development of renewable energies;

Enable energy storage;

Enable the tie-in of alternate sources of energy into the conventional energy grid

Support the development of technologies that enable energy efficiency and decreased environmental footprint in the oil-and-gas sector through SD Tech Fund.

SDG 9

Starting point:

Average of 20 cleantech projects (including some relating to clean energy) approved and contracted per year over past 5 years.

Average of 80% of projects completed within five years.

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

Maintain current level of approving and contracting 20 projects per year.

Average of 85% of projects completing within five years.

Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) approved 24 new projects in 2017–18.

SDTC has an overall average of 88% of projects completing within five years.

FSDS goal: sustainable managed lands and forests
FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target

Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions

Results achieved

Between now and 2020, maintain Canada's annual timber harvest at or below sustainable wood supply levels

Build capacity and provide support

Implement the SD Tech Fund

SDG 15

Starting point:

Average of 20 clean tech projects (including some relating to sustainable forestry) approved and contracted per year over past 5 years.

Average of 80% of projects completed within five years.

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

Maintain current level of approving and contracting 20 projects per year.

Average of 85% of projects completing within five years.

SDTC approved 24 new projects in 2017–18.

SDTC has an overall average of 88% of projects completing within five years.

FSDS goal: sustainable food
FSDS target(s)

FSDS contributing action(s)

Corresponding departmental action(s)

Support for UN Sustainable Development Goal target

Starting point(s), target(s) and performance indicator(s) for departmental actions

Results achieved

By 2030, agricultural working landscapes provide a stable or improved level of biodiversity and efficient management towards water and soil quality for food production

Promote innovation and sustainable practices

Support the development of technologies through the SD Tech Fund that:

Enable sustainable use of marginal agricultural lands

Enable the efficient use of water and other materials such as fertilizer in the agricultural sector

Enable the remediation of soil as it pertains to the agricultural industry

SDG 15

Starting point:

Average of 20 clean tech projects (including some relating to agriculture) approved and contracted per year over past 5 years.

Average of 80% of projects completed within five years.

Target(s)/performance indicator(s):

Maintain current level of approving and contracting 20 projects per year.

Average of 85% of projects completing within five years.

SDTC approved 24 new projects in 2017–18.

SDTC has an overall average of 88% of projects completing within five years.

FSDS goal: safe and healthy communities

Additional departmental sustainable development activities and initiatives related to safe and healthy communities

Additional departmental activities and initiatives Starting points, targets and performance indicators Results achieved
The National Research Council (NRC) will continue to implement the activities for which it is responsible under the Air Quality Management System with respect to indoor air quality. The NRC's work serves to reduce harmful emissions from building materials; improve indoor air quality; control and mitigate radon; and improve ventilation. The NRC also works with the Canadian Committee on Indoor Air Quality and Buildings. Improving the indoor air quality and health of Canadians by evaluating building-related systems, generating and supporting guides, establishing validated methods

Soil depressurization (SD) is the most accepted way to reduce radioactive radon in buildings. CAN/CGSB standard 149.12 was published on Radon mitigation options for existing low-rise residential buildings. This effort was successful because NRC could support the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) committee with critical scientific data sets obtained in NRC's unique (full-scale) research facilities.

Formaldehyde (FA) is a harmful gas emitted by building materials, especially by glues in engineered wood. NRC developed and evaluated this unique non-destructive method, supporting for example facility managers and mitigators to identify building materials contributing to excessive, harmful formaldehyde concentrations in indoor environments.

Radioactive Radon can enter buildings through the subslab of the basement, which is usually the main path. A "Technical Guide for Medium Density (MD) Spray Polyurethane Foam Insulation (SPUF) for Soil Gas (= in this case radon) Control Beneath Concrete Slabs-on-Ground" was delivered for the uptake by key stakeholder CUFCA (Canadian Urethane Foam Contractors Association). This guide demonstrates how radon ingress can be successfully reduced by MD-SPUF.


4. Report on integrating sustainable development

During the 2017–18 reporting cycle, ISED was 100% compliant in considering the environmental effects of proposals subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision-making processes. Through the Strategic Environmental Assessment process many of these departmental proposals were found to have positive effects on progress toward achieving the 2016 to 2019 FSDS goals and targets.

Additional information on the results of the Strategic Environmental Assessments is available on the department's website.

Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Program: Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Digital Economy

General information
Name of transfer payment program International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Geneva, Switzerland
Start date 1932–33 
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Grant
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2010–11
Strategic Outcome The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Digital Economy

Sub-Program: Spectrum and Telecommunications Policy and Legislation 

Description The Program works to secure Canada's interests in the global allocation of the radio frequency spectrum and satellite orbits; promote the development of voluntary standards to ensure a seamless interconnection and interoperability of global telecommunication networks and services; advance the interests of the Canadian telecommunications industry; promote regulatory environments that enhance competition, innovation, investment and entrepreneurship; build effective multi stakeholder participation and consultation, including access to ITU information and documentation; and promote Canadian telecommunication and information and communication technologies (ICT) expertise, products and services with member countries.
Results achieved

ISED leads the Government of Canada engagement at the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in order to ensure the continued growth, innovation and international competitiveness of Canada's telecommunication sector:

  • ISED participated in the World Telecommunication Development Conference (WTDC-17) held October 9–20, 2017. Canadian priorities and positions, including on telecommunications, Internet policy and technology issues, were advanced in the form of CITEL Inter-American Proposals (IAPs), and verbally during the Conference. In regard to IAPs, 28 out of 29 submitted were either adopted in full, or its substantive content reflected in modifications to existing resolutions.
  • At the ITU Council meeting in spring 2017, and Council Working Group (CWG) meetings in early 2017 and fall 2017, ISED successfully advanced Canadian priorities on ensuring continued efficiencies, transparency and accountability in the financial and human resource administration of the ITU. At these meetings ISED countered proposals aimed at broadening the mandate of the CWG on Internet issues to include producing concrete outcomes and recommendations on internet governance and cybersecurity matters that are outside the remit of the ITU.
  • ISED represented Canadian interests and participated in International Radiocommunication and Telecommunications forums. Work in Study Groups, Task Groups and negotiations focused on two upcoming treaty binding conferences: World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19) and Plenipotentiary Conference 2018 (PP-18). ISED's representation efforts advance international alignment with Canadian interests and work to prevent other administrations from introducing measures that would negatively impact Canadian interests.
Comments on variances Internal reallocation of resources completed through Supplementary Estimates.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2015–16: Evaluation of Industry Canada's Involvement in the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

An evaluation is planned for 2019–20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients The sole recipient of the grant is the International Telecommunication Union, the United Nations specialized agency for telecommunications. Engagement is outlined in the 'Description' and 'Results achieved' sections.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 5,725,000 5,608,000 4,808,000 5,633,000 5,633,000 825,000
Total program 5,725,000 5,608,000 4,808,000 5,633,000 5,633,000 825,000

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

General information
Name of transfer payment program

Canada Foundation for Innovation

Start date

April 25, 1998

End date

March 31, 2023

Type of transfer payment

Contribution

Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2015–16

Strategic Outcome

Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships

Description

The Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) is an independent corporation created by the Government of Canada to fund research infrastructure. The CFI's mandate is to strengthen the capacity of Canadian universities, colleges, research hospitals and non-profit research institutions to carry out world-class research and technology development that benefits Canadians.

Results achieved

The CFI continued to support world-class research through funding for infrastructure and associated operating costs.

Results from 2017–18 include:

  • $423.7 million was awarded to support 117 projects at 61 institutions (plus an additional $3.6 million to cover the costs of managing and governing projects that involve many institutions) through the 2017 Innovation Fund.
  • A total of $8.2 million was awarded to support 11 projects through Stream 1 of the College-Industry Innovation Fund.
  • A total of $2.35 million was awarded to four projects at four institutions through Stream 2 of the College-Industry Innovation Fund.
  • A total of $57.6 million was awarded to 338 projects through the John R. Evans Leaders Fund.
  • A total of $10.2 million was awarded to six proposals under the Cyberinfrastructure Initiative – Challenge 1.
  • $150.6 million was awarded to institutions across Canada to help operate and maintain state-of-the-art infrastructure through the Infrastructure Operating Fund.
  • The CFI undertook the review and adjudication for the third round of the Governor General's Innovation Awards.
Comments on variances

N/A

Audits completed or planned

A compliance audit was conducted in 2017–18

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2015–16: Evaluation of Industry Canada's Contribution to the Canada Foundation for Innovation.

An evaluation is planned for 2019–20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with the CFI and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that CFI submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of its funding/contribution agreements. Government officials also attend CFI Board of Directors meetings as observers.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 177,100,000 198,550,000 250,900,000 250,900,000 250,900,000 0
Total program 177,100,000 198,550,000 250,900,000 250,900,000 250,900,000 0

General information
Name of transfer payment program

Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR)

Start date

1986

End date

March 31, 2022

Type of transfer payment

Contributions

Type of appropriation

Funding for CIFAR's core activities is appropriated annually through the estimates process. CIFAR also receives funding for the Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence Strategy which is appropriated through statutory authority.

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017–18

Strategic Outcome

Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships

Description

The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) is a not-for-profit organization that supports networks of Canadian and international researchers who conduct long-term research on important scientific, social and economic issues. Promoting world-class research partnerships on these issues helps build research capacity in Canada. At present, CIFAR supports 12 research programs which engage 307 researchers in a range of areas, including experience-based brain and biological development, nanoelectronics, and quantum information processing. CIFAR is also responsible for implementing the federal government's Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence (AI) Strategy announced in Budget 2017, with aim to cement Canada's position as a world leader.

Results achieved
  • CIFAR engaged 307 researchers at different career stages and from different disciplines in its programs. They came from 19 countries and were based at 13 Canadian and 111 international institutions.
  • CIFAR fellows supervised 2,213 trainees: 707 postdoctoral fellows and 1,506 graduate students.
  • CIFAR's program led to 2,967 major publications, 14% of which were co-authored by two or more fellows. They also resulted in 9 major events and activities in knowledge mobilization as well as the development of 20 on-line resources such as research briefs and event briefs.
  • For each dollar received from the federal government, CIFAR was able to raise 1.3 dollar from other financial partners including provincial governments, the private sector and others.
  • CIFAR moved forward with implementing the federal government's $125 million Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence (AI) Strategy for research and training. Milestones achieved in 2017–18 included establishing three AI institutes in Edmonton, Toronto-Waterloo and Montreal and launching the CanadaCIFAR AI Chair program and the AI & Society program.
Comments on variances

Renewed and enhanced funding was received in Supplementary Estimates (Budget 2017).

Audits completed or planned

A recipient audit was completed in 2014–15.

An audit is planned for 2019–20.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2016–17: Evaluation of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research – 2017.

An evaluation is planned for 2021–22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with CIFAR and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that CIFAR submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreement.

In December 2017, ISED and CIFAR signed a contribution agreement providing support for CIFAR's core activities through 2021–22. ISED also engaged with CIFAR to update the contribution agreement in support of the Pan-Canadian Artificial intelligence Strategy.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 5,000,000 5,000,000 0 14,500,000 14,500,000 14,500,000
Total program 5,000,000 5,000,000 0 14,500,000 14,500,000 14,500,000

General information
Name of transfer payment program Centre for Drug Research and Development (CDRD)
Start date April 1, 2017
End date March 31, 2019
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships

Description The Centre for Drug Research and Development (CDRD) is a not-for-profit organization established in 2007 that works in partnership with academia, industry, government and foundations, to identify and de-risk promising discoveries in drug technology in order to stimulate increased private sector investment in the development and commercialization of related technologies. The CDRD links researchers from institutions across Canada and internationally, and provides researchers and entrepreneurs access to mentors, state-of-the-art expertise and infrastructure to facilitate drug discovery and development activities.
Results achieved

In 2017–18, CDRD:

  • Undertook 21 research and development projects;
  • Reached 36 project milestones;
  • Generated $12.88M in commercial/other revenue;
  • Advanced 11 projects towards commercialization;
  • Generated 8 new patents; and
  • Trained 24 new drug developers and bio-entrepreneurs.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned A compliance audit is planned for 2018–19.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation is planned for 2021–22.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with CDRD and will review the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that CDRD will submit each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 0 0 16,000,000 16,000,000 16,000,000 0
Total program 0 0 16,000,000 16,000,000 16,000,000 0

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Genome Canada
Start date March 27, 2000
End date March 31, 2020
Type of transfer payment Grant and Contribution
Type of appropriation Statutory Grant, Statutory Contribution, Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2012–13
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships

Description Genome Canada is a not-for-profit corporation that supports six independently incorporated regional Genome Centres across Canada. With the Genome Centres and other partners, Genome Canada invests in large-scale research projects, leading-edge technology platforms, and translation of research into applications, in key areas such as health, agriculture, the environment, fisheries, aquaculture, forestry, mining, and energy. Genome Canada also supports research projects aimed at studying and analyzing the ethical, environmental, economic, legal, and social issues related to genomics (GE3LS).
Results achieved

In 2017–18, Genome Canada:

  • Awarded funding to 15 large-scale genomics research projects applied to Canada's precision health sector and 10 technology platforms to support the development of improved technologies in health, agriculture and natural resources;
  • Awarded funding to 10 research translation projects aimed at advancing the application of genomics to real-life challenges;
  • Supported national and international strategic partnerships in genomics research, including the Structural Genomics Consortium, the International Rare Disease Research Consortium, E-Rare 3, the Cancer Stem Cell Dream Team and the Research Catalyst Network on Rare Diseases II;
  • Provided ongoing management and monitoring of funded research projects and technology platforms; and
  • Finalized the design of a large-scale research competition applied to the agriculture and agri-food sector, and the fisheries and aquaculture sector, launched in June 2018.
Comments on variances In 2017–18, Genome Canada project delays resulted in reduced program spending for an overall lapse of $9.4 million as compared to the original planned spending. As a result of these delays, lapsed funding was reprofiled to 2018–19 to better reflect the real funding requirements of multi-year research projects supported under this program.
Audits completed or planned

A performance audit was conducted in 2014–15.

A compliance audit is planned for 2018–19.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2015–16: Evaluation of Industry Canada's Contribution to Genome Canada.

An evaluation is planned for 2019–20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with Genome Canada and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that Genome Canada submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreements. Government officials also attend Genome Canada Board of Directors meetings as an observer.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16 Actual
spending
2016–17 Actual
spending
2017–18 Planned
spending
2017–18 Total
authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total Grants 7,400,000 4,500,000 1,700,000 1,700,000 1,700,000 0
Total contributions 60,000,000 62,400,000 66,800,000 57,400,000 57,400,000 (9,400,000)
Total program 67,400,000 66,900,000 68,500,000 59,100,000 59,100,000 (9,400,000)

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Institute for Quantum Computing
Start date April 2, 2009
End date March 31, 2019
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships

Description The Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) is a research institute based at the University of Waterloo. The IQC's mission is to be the world leader in the development of quantum technologies, and its objective is to create a supportive environment for physicists, mathematicians, engineers and computer scientists to advance the fields of quantum information science.
Results achieved

In 2017–18, the ICQ:

  • Published 144 papers in prominent scientific publications that were cited by other researchers a total of 32,075 times (as of March 31, 2018);
  • IQC researchers collectively hosted 167 scientific visits, representing a 13.4% increase from the previous year;
  • Hosted four conferences, two workshops, 38 seminars and 22 colloquia to foster collaboration and promote idea exchange;
  • Recruited 44 new graduate students from 190 applications and granted degrees to 17 students – 9 with PhDs and 8 Master's students;
  • Recruited 3 new faculty to support research, bringing the total of full-time faculty to 29 members; and
  • As of March 2018, holds over 41 granted patents and 30 licenses and has over 50 patent applications pending approval.
Comments on variances Renewed funding was received in Supplementary Estimates (Budget 2017).
Audits completed or planned A compliance audit was conducted in 2016–17.
Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2013–14: Evaluation of Industry Canada's Grant to the Institute for Quantum Computing

An evaluation is planned for 2020–21.

Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with the IQC and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that the IQC submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreement.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 4,975,000 5,000,000 0 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000
Total program 4,975,000 5,000,000 0 5,000,000 5,000,000 5,000,000

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Mitacs Inc.
Start date April 1st 2012
End date March 31, 2022
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2012–13
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description Mitacs Inc. (Mitacs) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to promoting high-quality research and innovation by building linkages between academia and industry, and strengthening linkages between researchers and students in Canada and abroad across all academic disciplines. Through its Accelerate program, Mitacs provides opportunities for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to apply their expertise to business-related research challenges through four- to six-month internships with companies and not-for-profit corporations. Through its Globalink program, Mitacs provides short-term research internships in Canada for foreign senior undergraduate and/or graduate students from priority countries, short-term research internships in priority countries for Canadian senior undergraduate and/or graduate students, and graduate fellowships for top international alumni of the research internships who pursue graduate studies in Canada. Through its Elevate program, Mitacs provides postdoctoral fellows with industry-relevant research experience and training that help them develop the skills necessary to lead and manage research and development projects within industry.
Results achieved

For 2017–18, Mitacs delivered:

  • 6,562 Accelerate internships (target was 6,500);
  • 178 Elevate fellowships (target was 200); and
  • 1,279 Globalink awards (target was 1,020). 
Comments on variances New funding was received in Supplementary Estimates to support the objective of providing 10,000 work-integrated learning placements for Canadian post-secondary students and graduates each year — up from the previous level of around 3,750 placements (Budget 2017).
Audits completed or planned A compliance audit is planned for 2019–20.
Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2016–17: Evaluation of ISED's contribution to Mitacs.

An evaluation is planned for 2021–22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with Mitacs and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that Mitacs submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreements. An ISED official attends Mitacs Board of Directors meetings as an observer.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 19,000,000 38,900,000 39,500,000 51,000,000 51,000,000 11,500,000
Total program 19,000,000 38,900,000 39,500,000 51,000,000 51,000,000 11,500,000

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
Start date April 1, 2007
End date July 31, 2022
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships

Description The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics is a non-profit, research institute devoted to foundational issues in theoretical physics at the highest levels of international excellence. The Institute pursues scientific research and engages in educational outreach activities, bringing together international scientists to push the limits of understanding of physical laws and develop new ideas about the very essence of space, time, matter and information. The Institute provides a multi-disciplinary environment to foster research in cosmology, particle physics, quantum foundations, quantum gravity, quantum information, superstring theory and related areas.
Results achieved

In 2017–18, the Perimeter Institute:

  • Advanced fundamental research through the publication of 495 high-calibre papers;
  • Launched the Centre for the Universe at Perimeter Institute to tackle some of the most important questions in cosmology;
  • Appointed a new Perimeter Research Chair;
  • Welcomed 23 new postdocs and recruited 18 more for 2018–19;
  • Completed advanced training of 31 master's students in the Perimeter Scholars International program (PSI), and 54 PhD students in residence;
  • Recruited 34 new PSI students from 512 applications;
  • Hosted more than 400 scientific visits, including 14 Distinguished Visiting Research Chairs, 21 Visiting Fellows, and 9 Emmy Noether Fellows;
  • Hosted 19 conferences and workshops focused on leading-edge topics and presented 290 scientific talks; and
  • Reached more than 500,000 people on-site and online through eight talks and events in the Perimeter Public Lecture Series.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned A compliance audit was completed in 2014.
Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2016–17: Evaluation of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics.

An evaluation is planned for 2020–21.

Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with the Perimeter Institute and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that the Perimeter Institute submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the funding agreement. Site visits and ISED attendance at Perimeter events are used to provide direct experience of the Institute's performance and activities for ISED employees engaged in providing oversight.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 0
Total program 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 10,000,000 0

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund
Start date April 14, 2016
End date December 31, 2019
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships

Description The Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund's objective is the acceleration of strategic construction, repair and maintenance activities at universities and colleges across Canada to generate direct economic activity and to enhance the research infrastructure at post-secondary institutions so as to strengthen capacity for research and innovation and industry-related training and to support environmental sustainability.
Results achieved

300 projects were approved through the signing of contribution agreements with 13 provincial/territorial jurisdictions and three bilateral institutions. As of June 30, 2018, 154 projects had reached substantial completion.

Due to many projects reporting unforeseen delays, a program extension process was launched in February 2018, revising the project deadline from April 30, 2018 to November 30, 2018 for authorized projects.

Comments on variances Consistent with the program extension, an amount of $265M was reprofiled to 2018–19.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned A program evaluation is planned to be completed in 2018–19.
Engagement of applicants and recipients

ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with provinces and territories for delivery of the PSI-SIF program. Quarterly Reports are provided to ISED for each project funded under PSI-SIF to monitor progress and develop payment recommendations. Site visits are used to gather direct feedback and to monitor progress.

Process launched in February 2018 to allow projects to seek an extension to November 2018 for substantial completion.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 0 740,926,765 995,423,553 996,759,904 731,759,904 (263,663,649)
Total program 0 740,926,765 995,423,553 996,759,904 731,759,904 (263,663,649)

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Stem Cell Network
Start date July 22, 2016
End date July 31, 2018
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships
Description The Stem Cell Network (SCN) is a national not-for-profit corporation dedicated to enabling the translation of stem cell research into clinical applications, commercial products and public policy. It was first established in 2001 as one of the Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE). SCN links to 27 Canadian universities and hospitals, and international collaborators from 39 institutions in eight countries. The contribution to SCN is non-repayable.
Results achieved

In 2017–18, SCN:

  • Completed 25 research projects and 6 research projects supporting clinical trials;
  • A funding competition ran in August 2017 resulted in 24 new research projects and clinical trial awards for 2018–19;
  • Hosted the 2017 Till and McCulloch Meetings in Mont-Tremblant, Québec, November 6–8, 2017; and
  • Over the year, SCN supported 324 highly qualified personnel participating in one of 14 different skill development opportunities.
Comments on variances Variance is due to varying cash flow requirements submitted by SCN to pay for its multi-year research projects. SCN's expenditures were higher in the first year than the second year of its contribution.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned None planned or completed.
Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with Stem cell Network and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that Stem Cell Network submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total grants 0 6,794,532 6,000,000 5,205,468 5,205,468 (794,532)
Total program 0 6,794,532 6,000,000 5,205,468 5,205,468 (794,532)

General Information
Name of transfer payment program CANARIE Inc
Start date 1993
End date March 31, 2020
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2014–15
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships

Description CANARIE is a not-for-profit organization established in 1993 to deliver Canada's only research and education network, allowing Canadians to engage in leading-edge research. CANARIE operates and develops the backbone of Canada's advanced, high-speed research network, and facilitates and supports publicly funded research and innovation. In partnership with regional advanced networks, the CANARIE network connects Canadian research facilities, universities, educational institutions, hospitals and other science facilities as well as links them to their international peers. It is an essential tool for researchers, innovators and educators. 
Results achieved
  • In May 2017, CANARIE launched Canada's first Global Exchange Point for research and education (R&E) which enables researchers to collaborate with their peers around the world by facilitating the interconnection of global research and education networks and content providers.
  • CANARIE's DAIR program, which offers powerful cloud computing resources to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), to accelerate their product development timelines, saw an increase in the total number of users to over 900.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned A compliance audit was conducted in 2016–17.
Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2014–15: Evaluation of Industry Canada's Contribution to CANARIE.

An evaluation is planned to be completed in 2018–19.

Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains ongoing dialogue with CANARIE and reviews the Annual Business Plan and Annual Report that the recipient submits to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results as well as compliance with the terms and conditions of the Contribution Agreement. A government official also attends CANARIE Board of Directors meetings as an observer.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 15,000,000 20,000,000 23,800,000 24,369,532 22,300,000 (1,500,000)
Total program 15,000,000 20,000,000 23,800,000 24,369,532 22,300,000 (1,500,000)

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) – SD Tech Fund™
Start date March 26, 2001
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships

Description To support the development and demonstration of innovative Canadian technological solutions that address climate change, clean air, clean water and clean soil. This transfer payment program provides non-repayable contributions.
Results achieved

In 2017–18, SDTC's Board of Directors approved 24 new projects across Canada and SDTC is on track to increase investments in 2018–19 by more than 40%. As of March 31, 2018, SDTC has invested over $1 billion in over 300 companies across all major economic sectors, leveraging an additional $2.7 billion in funding from other sources.

Over 1,500 new (direct and indirect) jobs were created by SDTC-funded companies in 2017–18. Additionally, SDTC-supported clean technology companies are delivering an estimated 13.8 megatonnes CO2e of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions as of March 31, 2018.

Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned The Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development conducted a performance audit of three federal funds for clean energy technologies, including SDTC, which was tabled in Parliament on October 3, 2017.
Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2017–18: Evaluation of the Sustainable Development Technology Fund.

An evaluation is planned for 2022–23.

Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED maintains an ongoing dialogue with the SDTC and reviews the Corporate Plan and Annual Report that SDTC submits each year to monitor progress towards the achievement of expected results and compliance with the terms and conditions of its funding/contribution agreements. Government officials also attend SDTC Board of Directors meetings as observers.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 0 85,235,002 101,540,514 126,240,993 101,540,514 0
Total program 0 85,235,002 101,540,514 126,240,993 101,540,514 0

General Information
Name of transfer payment programInnovation Superclusters Initiative
Start date May 24, 2017
End date March 31, 2023
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimate
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Sub-Program: Science and Technology Partnerships

Description The Program supports the acceleration of world-leading innovation superclusters in Canada that translate the country's strengths into new commercial opportunities for Canadian firms.
Results achieved The Innovation Superclusters Initiative was launched on May 24, 2017. On February 15, 2018, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development announced the five superclusters selection: the Ocean Supercluster (Atlantic Canada), the AI-Powered Supply Chains Supercluster (SCALE.AI) (Quebec), the Advanced Manufacturing Supercluster (Ontario), the Protein Industries Supercluster (Prairie Provinces) and the Digital Technology Supercluster (British Columbia).
Comments on variances New funding was received in Supplementary Estimates to support a small number of business-led innovation "superclusters" that have the greatest potential to accelerate economic growth (Budget 2017). As Canada's five superclusters were announced on February 15, 2018, the amount has been reprofiled to future fiscal years.
Audits completed or planned An internal audit is planned for 2019–20.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation is planned for 2021–22.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Prior to the Initiative's launch, consultations were held with stakeholders across the country that included a series of roundtables on innovation. The process to select the superclusters consisted of a Letter of Intent phase in which more than 50 applications representing over 1,000 businesses and 350 other organizations from all regions of Canada were received.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 0 0 0 43,679,356 0 0
Total program 0 0 0 43,679,356 0 0

Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Strategic Innovation Fund
Start date July 5, 2017
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates 
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing
Description The Strategic Innovation Fund is a $1.26-billion program that will attract and support high-quality business investments in Canada's most dynamic and innovative sectors. This new fund will help innovative businesses scale up, while supporting R&D, technology demonstration and high-growth industries.
Results achieved As of March 31, 2018, 16 contribution agreements have been signed, which will result in tangible benefits to Canadians such as maintaining and creating jobs, and leveraging further investments in the Canadian economy. These projects represent a variety of sectors across Canada, including digital industries, advanced manufacturing and clean resources. These projects represent companies with inclusive business and hiring practices. 
Comments on variances New funding was received in Supplementary Estimates to create the new Strategic Innovation Fund, to consolidate and simplify existing business innovation programming, in particular the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative, Technology Demonstration Program, Automotive Innovation Fund and Automotive Supplier Innovation Program (Budget 2017). Part of the funding was reprofiled to future years as a result of project delays.
Audits completed or planned An internal audit is planned for 2020–21.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation is planned for 2020–21
Engagement of applicants and recipients As a project progresses and companies submit claims for reimbursements, the project is reviewed to ensure commitments are met. In addition, an annual projects benefit report will be sent to each recipient to quantify their progress around economic, innovation and public benefits. Information will be collected cumulatively so that ongoing progress can be tracked.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 0 0 0 50,494,484 35,451,558 35,451,558
Total program 0 0 0 50,494,484 35,451,558 35,451,558

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Automotive Innovation Fund
Start date May 9, 2008
End date March 31, 2021; Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing

Sub-Program: Automotive Innovation

Description The Automotive Innovation Fund (AIF) supports strategic, large-scale research and development projects to develop innovative, greener and more fuel-efficient vehicles.
Results achieved Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for results.
Comments on variances Following consolidation of the AIF under the Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF), funding was transferred to SIF for future years. Other transfer and reprofiling requests were also approved to address other program needs.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed. 
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was completed in 2017–18.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for engagement information.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 92,266,600 22,127,500 98,566,809 42,572,741 42,572,741 (55,994,068)
Total program 92,266,600 22,127,500 98,566,809 42,572,741 42,572,741 (55,994,068)

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Automotive Supplier Innovation Program
Start date June 3, 2015
End date March 31, 2020; Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2015–16
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing

Sub-Program: Automotive Innovation

Description The Automotive Supplier Innovation Program (ASIP) is a five-year, $100 million program that provides non-repayable contributions to support technology demonstration and prototyping activities of Canadian-based suppliers developing innovative products and/or processes in the automotive sector.
Results achieved Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for results.
Comments on variances Following consolidation of ASIP under the Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF), funding was transferred to SIF for future years. Other transfer and reprofiling requests were also approved to address other program needs.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation is planned for 2020–21.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for engagement information.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 4,031,418 14,631,036 24,484,628 7,171,364 7,171,364 (17,313,264)
Total program 4,031,418 14,631,036 24,484,628 7,171,364 7,171,364 (17,313,264)

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative
Start date April 2, 2007
End date March 31, 2023; Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing

Sub-Program: Aerospace and Defence Innovation

Description The Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) encourages the development of innovative products, processes and services; enhances the competitiveness of Canadian aerospace, defence, space and security (A&D) firms; and fosters collaboration among research institutes, universities, colleges and the private sector. SADI is a component of the government's strategy to mobilize science and technology to Canada's competitive advantage. SADI acts as a catalyst for new A&D investments by providing repayable contributions to Canadian A&D companies for strategic industrial research and pre-competitive development.
Results achieved Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for results.
Comments on variances Consistent with the Government's February 2017 announcement, additional support was provided to Bombardier.
Audits completed or planned An audit was completed in 2016–17: Audit of the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative – Phase I (Final Audit Report).
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation was completed in 2016–17: Evaluation of the Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for engagement information.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 122,576,689 152,757,470 177,912,000 247,504,760 247,504,760 69,592,760
Total program 122,576,689 152,757,470 177,912,000 247,504,760 247,504,760 69,592,760

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Technology Demonstration Program
Start date September 4, 2013
End date March 31, 2024; Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing

Sub-Program: Aerospace and Defence Innovation

Description The Technology Demonstration Program (TDP) provides non-repayable contributions in support of large-scale research and development technology demonstration projects in the aerospace, defence, space and security (A&D) sectors. Projects will be led by an Original Equipment Manufacturer or Tier 1 integrator, collaborating with small and medium-sized firms and post-secondary institutions. Projects funded through this program are expected to be the basis for next-generation manufacturing and services in Canada. The program supports technological development in areas that have significant potential for broad-based and long-term economic benefits for Canada.
Results achieved Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for results.
Comments on variances Following consolidation of TDP under the Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF), funding was transferred to SIF for future years. Other transfer and reprofiling requests were also approved to address other program needs.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation is planned to be completed in 2018–19.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Consolidated into SIF July 5, 2017. See SIF program for engagement information.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 15,067,258 28,397,628 49,025,560 25,209,647 25,209,647 (23,815,913)
Total program 15,067,258 28,397,628 49,025,560 25,209,647 25,209,647 (23,815,913)

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Bombardier CSeries
Start date September 2008
End date 2034
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing

Sub-Program: Aerospace and Defence Innovation

Description On February 7, 2017, the Government of Canada announced that it would provide $372.5 million in repayable contributions to Bombardier Inc. $120 million is allocated to ongoing activities related to the development of the company's C Series aircraft, while the remaining amount funds research and development for the Global 7000 business jet. This funding is provided over four years and will support middle-class jobs, strengthen the long-term competitiveness of Bombardier and help build the aircraft of the future.
Results achieved The program supports the successful development and launch of new fixed-wing commercial aircraft in the 100 to 160 seat segment.
Comments on variances Consistent with the Government's February 2017 announcement, additional support was provided to Bombardier.
Audits completed or planned An audit was completed in 2014–15: Audit of the Bombardier CSeries Contribution Agreements.
Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2013–14: Evaluation of the Bombardier CSeries Program.

An evaluation is planned to be completed in 2018–19.

Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED and Bombardier engage regularly on the status of projects through quarterly status reports during the claims process.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 0 55,447,443 0 29,725,449 29,725,449 29,725,449
Total program 0 55,447,443 0 29,725,449 29,725,449 29,725,449

Program: Small Business Research, Financing and Services

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Canada Small Business Financing Program
Start date 1999
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Other Payment Program
Type of appropriation Statutory – Canada Small Business Financing Act
Fiscal year for terms and conditions Ongoing (Statutory program)
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and communities are competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Small Business Research, Financing and Services

Sub-Program: Small Business Financing and Growth 

Description The Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) helps Canadian small businesses access financing that would not otherwise be available or would be available only under less favourable terms. It is a loan loss-sharing program involving partnerships with financial institutions. To be eligible, borrowers must be for-profit businesses with revenues of up to $10 million per year. Under the program, financial institutions can make term loans on real property, leasehold improvements and equipment. In the event that a registered loan defaults, the government pays 85 percent of net eligible losses. The CSBFP is a national program that operates in all provinces and territories.
Results achieved

In 2017–18, CSBFP:

  • Facilitated access to 5,901 loans worth $1.2 billion in debt financing to small businesses.
  • Conducted training sessions, webinars and provided promotional educational tools to help financial institutions.
  • Continued communicating with financial institutions to improve program delivery and efficiencies.

For additional information on the administration of the CSBFP, including historical data tables, please visit Canada.ca/csbfp.

Comments on variances The difference between planned spending and actual spending is primarily due to less risky loans being made by financial institutions to finance real property assets in recent years, resulting in fewer defaults and subsequent claims being paid on those loans.
Audits completed or planned

An internal audit was completed in 2013–14: Audit Report of the Canada Small Business Financing Program.

An IT General Computer Controls audit and an Expense Payment Cycle audit were completed in March 2018.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2014–15: Evaluation of the Canada Small Business Financing Program.

An evaluation is planned for 2019–20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients ISED will continue to collaborate with lenders, other federal/provincial government departments, and business support organizations in order to improve their knowledge of the CSBFP.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 62,699,806 63,079,578 69,029,621 51,300,219 51,300,219 (17,729,402)
Total program 62,699,806 63,079,578 69,029,621 51,300,219 51,300,219 (17,729,402)

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Futurpreneur Canada
Start date April 1, 2017
End date March 31, 2019
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and communities are competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Small Business Research, Financing and Services

Sub-Program: Small Business Financing and Growth 

Description Futurpreneur Canada supports young Canadian entrepreneurs aged 18–39 who see entrepreneurship as a viable career option and want to start their own businesses but who would not typically be supported by traditional lending institutions. Futurpreneur provides loans of up to $15,000 and two years of mandatory mentoring. Futurpreneur also provides business planning support.
Results achieved

Futurpreneur has completely met its target of supporting 1,000 businesses per fiscal year. Futurpreneur clients have a 50–60% survival rate, which is in line with the national average for businesses run by entrepreneurs of all ages, including older and more established entrepreneurs.

42% of Futurpreneur businesses supported in 2017–18 were either majority female-owned or women-led (more than double the national average).

On average, 5 jobs are created by each Futurpreneur business, and the organization has over 200 active community referral partners, and more than 3,000 skilled volunteer mentors.

Comments on variances New funding was received in Supplementary Estimates to continue Futurpreneur's work of supporting the next generation of entrepreneurs (Budget 2017).
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation is planned to be completed in 2018–19.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Futurpreneur Canada is the sole eligible recipient of the funding. The organization met reporting requirements by providing four quarterly reports and a final annual report. 
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 7,000,000 7,000,000 0 7,000,000 7,000,000 7,000,000
Total program 7,000,000 7,000,000 0 7,000,000 7,000,000 7,000,000

Program: Community Economic Development

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Computers for Schools
Start date 1993
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Canadian businesses and communities are competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Community Economic Development

Sub-Program: Computer and Internet Access

Description

Through the Computers for Schools (CFS) program, surplus computers donated by federal, provincial and territorial government departments and private donors are refurbished by provincial and territorial program partners. Once refurbished, they are distributed to schools, libraries, not-for-profit organizations, Indigenous communities and eligible low-income Canadians across Canada. Through this national partnership-based network, the program continues to meet the ongoing demand for computers, ensuring improved access for Canadians to computer technology. The Technical Work Experience Program (TWEP), also know as CFS interns, is also delivered by CFS affiliates and results and spending stemming from TWEP are reported by Employment and Social Development Canada under the Youth Employment Strategy. Under TWEP, eligible youth are given valuable work experience through internships targeted to develop and enhance information and communications technology (ICT) skills.

Building on the success of the CFS Program, a low-cost Internet initiative, Connecting Families initiative, was included to connect low-income Canadians to low-cost Internet solutions being offered by Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in their area. Eligible families will access the program through a web portal being developed by Computers for Success Canada, and will also be provided with up to 50,000 computers refurbished through the CFS program.

Results achieved

ISED has effectively worked with its recipients to deliver the TWEP internship program. In 2017–18, the affiliates employed 262 interns. The affiliates also distributed 76,653 computers. TWEP intern diversity was addressed as a priority on the agendas of the CFS annual program meetings in 2016 and 2017 with efforts that target female interns. The program is on track for increasing the female participation in TWEP.

The Connected Families initiative is underway with a signed Contribution Agreement with Computers for Success Canada for web portal development. ISED is working with ISPs, federal government departments and civil society to understand key objectives of such an initiative.

Comments on variances New funding was received in Supplementary Estimates for the low-cost Internet initiative to be provided under Computers for Schools – TWEP (Budget 2017). Funding was also reallocated internally from Computers for Schools-TWEP to Computers for Schools.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2016–17: Evaluation of Computers for Schools.

An evaluation is planned for 2021–22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients Recipients are engaged through regular monitoring. All recipients participate in bi-monthly teleconferences, site visits and an annual meeting is held to discuss issues, trends and the future of the program.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions (Computers for Schools) 5,523,922 5,684,811 5,000,000 5,718,594 5,503,898 503,898
Total contributions (Technical Work Experience Program) 3,625,484 4,008,678 3,200,242 5,106,648 4,596,442 1,396,200
Total program 9,149,406 9,693,489 8,200,242 10,825,242 10,100,340 1,900,098

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Connecting Canadians Program (CCP)
Start date June 5, 2014
End date March 31, 2019
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2014–15
Strategic Outcome Canadian businesses and communities are competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Community Economic Development

Sub-Program: Computer and Internet Access

Description This program funds the extension and enhancement of high-speed broadband networks to reach previously underserved communities in rural and northern Canada. It is also responsible for maintaining current maps of broadband coverage across Canada and for working with other government partners to coordinate support for broadband infrastructure.
Results achieved As of March 31, 2018, 37 of 87 Connecting Canadians projects are completed. Work is ongoing with program recipients, and is on track to meet the program target of providing broadband internet access to 280,000 Canadian households.
Comments on variances Internal transfers to address other program needs.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation is planned for 2019–20.
Engagement of applicants and recipients

Applicants and recipients were engaged throughout 2017–18. The Program worked with selected applicants to finalize applications and contribution agreements and announce projects. Recipients were engaged throughout the monitoring of contribution agreements and the progress of projects. The Program also seeks ongoing feedback from recipients regarding the efficacy of its processes and tools.

The Program conducted outreach to interested stakeholders, including provincial and territorial governments and other organizations, to discuss remaining underserved areas within their respective jurisdictions and a way forward, including potential projects of interest.

Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 66,980,458 69,975,122 76,000,000 61,552,775 44,220,537 (31,779,463)
Total program 66,980,458 69,975,122 76,000,000 61,552,775 44,220,537 (31,779,463)

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Connect to Innovate (CTI) Program
Start date December 15, 2016
End date March 31, 2021
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and communities are competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Community Economic Development

Sub-Program: Computer and Internet Access

Description A $500 million program announced in Budget 2016 that focuses on extending and enhancing high-capacity backbone infrastructure and high-speed internet to rural and remote communities across Canada, with flexibility to fund backbone upgrades, resiliency, and some last-mile infrastructure for underserved households, institutions and businesses.
Results achieved

As of March 31, 2018:

  • 191 CTI applications are conditionally approved, accounting for an investment of $478M of the $500M program budget. These projects will benefit over 900 rural and remote communities, tripling the initial target of 300 communities for the entire country.
  • 26 announcements have been made related to CTI, with funding announced for 138 projects in 7 provinces and territories.

In addition, within 15 months of the program launch, the number of website hits exceeded 15 times the target to reach 156,875 hits (from December 15, 2016 to March 15, 2018).

Comments on variances Following analysis of applications received, funding was reprofiled to 2019-20 to address project needs.
Audits completed or planned None planned or completed.
Evaluations completed or planned An evaluation is planned for 2019–20.
Engagement of applicants and recipients Applicants and recipients were engaged throughout 2017–18. The Program worked with selected applicants to finalize applications and contribution agreements and announce projects. Recipients were engaged throughout the monitoring of contribution agreements and the progress of projects. The Program also seeks ongoing feedback from recipients regarding the efficacy of its processes and tools.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 0 0 65,874,564 80,874,564 7,224,000 (58,650,564)
Total program 0 0 65,874,564 80,874,564 7,224,000 (58,650,564)

General Information
Name of transfer payment program CanCode
Start date June 8, 2017
End date March 31, 2019
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2017–18
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and communities are competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Community Economic Development

Sub-Program: Computer and Internet Access

Description CanCode supports the development of skills that Canada's youth and their teachers will need to participate in a digital economy by providing them access to coding education and experiences.
Results achieved

Of 81 eligible applications, 21 CanCode projects were approved and announced in January 2018. The funded CanCode initiatives will teach a range of digital skills and content creation techniques including coding concepts, cybersecurity, 2D/3D game development, robotics, artificial intelligence and virtual reality. The approved projects will reach about 1 million Canadian students and their teachers with a focus on girls and students in urban, rural, Northern and First Nations communities.

As of March 31, 2018 over 265,000 students and over 14,500 teachers had participated in CanCode activities.

Comments on variances New funding was received in Supplementary Estimates to help provide coding and digital skills education to more young Canadians (Budget 2017).
Audits completed or planned None completed or planned.
Evaluations completed or planned N/A
Engagement of applicants and recipients Recipients are engaged through quarterly monitoring and reporting. In addition, ISED participated in a best practices sharing session organized by a recipient.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus
2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 0 0 0 19,060,685 17,899,923 17,899,923
Total program 0 0 0 19,060,685 17,899,923 17,899,923

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program
Start date April 1, 2016
End date March 31, 2018
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2016–17 – 2017–18
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and communities are competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Community Economic Development

Sub-Program: Northern Ontario Economic Development

Description The Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program (CIP150) is a national program administered by FedNor in Northern Ontario and the regional development agencies in the rest of Canada. The objective is to mark the celebration of Canada's 150th anniversary. This is achieved by investing in the rehabilitation or improvement, including expansion, of existing community infrastructure assets and facilities to not-for-profit organizations, including municipalities and First Nations in Northern Ontario, community, economic development and Aboriginal organizations, provincial entities that provide municipal-type services to communities, as defined in provincial statutes and public sector bodies.
Results achieved Final results achieved for the two-year program included the approval of 167 projects and funding of $10.4M, which leveraged an additional $21M from other sources.
Comments on variances The difference between planned spending and actual spending is the result of funding that was reprofiled from 2016–17.
Audits completed or planned Recipient Audit is planned for 2018–19.
Evaluations completed or planned N/A
Engagement of applicants and recipients FedNor continued to engage with CIP 150 clients with regards to the development and management of their contribution agreements to ensure timely completion of projects prior to the end of the program.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 0 3,272,937 5,200,000 7,000,000 6,717,518 1,517,518
Total program 0 3,272,937 5,200,000 7,000,000 6,717,518 1,517,518

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Community Futures Program
Start date 1986
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2010–11
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and communities are competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Community Economic Development

Sub-Program: Northern Ontario Economic Development

Description The Community Futures Program (CFP) is a national program administered by ISED in Northern Ontario and the regional development agencies in the rest of Canada. The ultimate objectives of the program are to foster economic stability, growth and job creation; help create diversified and competitive local rural economies; and help build sustainable communities. ISED provides financial support to 24 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) in Northern Ontario, that are incorporated, not-for-profit, community-based development organizations, each governed by a local volunteer board of directors. They offer a variety of products and services to support small business growth and community economic development, including access to capital, strategic community planning and socio-economic development; support for community-based projects and special initiatives; and business information, planning and support services. ISED provides financial contributions to support the ongoing operations of individual CFDCs through either one, three or five-year agreements.
Results achieved Through the Community Futures Program, FedNor engaged the 24 Northern Ontario Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) to foster economic stability, growth and job creation, help create diversified and competitive local rural economies and build economically sustainable communities in Northern Ontario. In 2017–18, Northern Ontario CFDCs invested $23.4 million in SMEs, leveraging $30.9 million. As a result of this lending activity, 854 businesses were assisted, started, expanded and/or maintained, creating and/or maintaining 1,615 jobs.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned An audit was completed in 2014–15: Audit Report—Community Futures Program.
Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2014–15: Evaluation of the Community Futures Program.

An evaluation is planned to be completed in 2018–19.

Engagement of applicants and recipients FedNor continued to engage Community Futures Organizations, including Community Futures Development Corporations, their regional networks and provincial association, through various activities including outreach/liaison, capacity building, program and policy development, referrals, compliance monitoring in regard to contribution agreements, and other collaborative activities including the Prosperity and Growth Strategy for Northern Ontario.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus
2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 8,360,008 8,360,008 8,360,008 8,360,008 8,360,008 0
Total program 8,360,008 8,360,008 8,360,008 8,360,008 8,360,008 0

General Information
Name of transfer payment program Northern Ontario Development Program
Start date April 1, 1996
End date Ongoing
Type of transfer payment Contribution
Type of appropriation Appropriated annually through Estimates
Fiscal year for terms and conditions 2011–12
Strategic Outcome Canadian Businesses and communities are competitive
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program: Community Economic Development

Sub-Program: Northern Ontario Economic Development

Description The Northern Ontario Development Program (NODP) is administered by FedNor. The NODP's objective is to promote economic development, economic diversification, job creation and sustainable, self-reliant communities in Northern Ontario. This is achieved by providing financial support, through transfer payments, to small and medium-sized enterprises and not-for-profit organizations, including municipalities, municipal organizations, community development organizations and research institutions, in three priority areas: community economic development, business growth and competitiveness, and innovation.
Results achieved In 2017–18, through the Northern Ontario Development Program, FedNor authorized $41.1 million towards 104 projects, which leveraged an additional investment of $92.1 million. 66 projects were completed during this period, resulting in the creation and/or maintenance of 1,593 jobs and the creation of 604 businesses.
Comments on variances N/A
Audits completed or planned An audit was completed in 2013–14: Audit of the Northern Ontario Development Program.
Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation was completed in 2016–17: Northern Ontario Development Program.

An evaluation is planned for 2020–21.

Engagement of applicants and recipients FedNor led the development of the Prosperity and Growth Strategy for Northern Ontario which will act as an economic development roadmap for the region in support of the Government of Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan. This process included extensive and comprehensive engagement efforts with approximately 1,000 key stakeholders to ensure the future strategy is effective in addressing issues important to Canadians living and working in Northern Ontario. As a result of these engagement activities, FedNor compiled the What We Heard report, providing a preliminary overview of comments, which is now being used to consult with federal and provincial partners to gather views and ideas on issues and opportunities identified by stakeholders.
Performance Information (dollars)
Type of Transfer Payment 2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus
2017–18 planned)
Total contributions 35,279,600 31,540,000 31,840,000 30,640,000 30,640,000 (1,200,000)
Total program 35,279,600 31,540,000 31,840,000 30,640,000 30,640,000 (1,200,000)

Evaluations

Evaluations completed, or planned to be completed, in 2017–18
Title of evaluation Status Deputy head approval date Link to department's programs
Evaluation of Canadian Intellectual Property Office's Patent Services Completed May 2017 Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO)
Evaluation of the Sustainable Development Technology Fund Completed April 2018* Sustainable Development Technology Fund
Evaluation of the Council on Canadian Academies Completed April 2018* Council of Canadian Academies
Horizontal Evaluation of Canada's Anti-Spam Legislation Completed April 2018* Canada's Anti-Spam Legislation
Evaluation of the Automotive Innovation Fund Completed April 2018* Automotive Innovation Fund

*The evaluations were completed and considered by the Performance Measurement and Evaluation Committee in 2017–18 but were formally approved by the Deputy Minister in the first quarter of 2018–19.

Fees

Owing to legislative changes, the 2017 to 2018 fees results will be published in a separate report. The Fees Report is currently under development, and the link to the Fees Report, once tabled in Parliament, will appear on this web page by March 31, 2019.

Internal audits

Internal audit engagements completed in 2017–18
Title of internal audit Completion date
Audit of Measurement Canada August 2017
Audit of the Canadian Intellectual Property Office IT Modernization Program January 2018
Audit of the Canadian Intellectual Property Office – Trademarks Branch April 2018*
Audit of the Campus Custodial Services at the Communications Research Centre April 2018*

*The audits were completed and considered by the Departmental Audit Committee in 2017–18 but were formally approved by the Deputy Minister in the first quarter of 2018–19.

Response to parliamentary committees and external audits

Response to parliamentary committees

There were no parliamentary committee reports requiring a response in 2017–18.

Response to audits conducted by the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

2017 Fall Reports of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development

Report 2 - Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change

This audit focused on the extent to which federal organizations had made progress in adapting to climate change. The audit examined federal leadership efforts and whether departments and agencies implemented the Federal Adaptation Policy Framework. The audit also examined the progress made by determining whether 19 key departments and agencies, including ISED, identified and assessed climate change risks and took measures to adapt to climate change in their areas of responsibility.

The audit led to five recommendations (including one recommendation applicable to ISED), which have all been agreed to by the departments and agencies involved.

Report 3 - Funding Clean Energy Technologies

This audit focused on whether Natural Resources Canada (NRC) and Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) managed demonstration projects in three federal funds for clean energy technologies in compliance with the conditions of the funds. It also focused on whether NRC and SDTC articulated how selected funded projects were contributing to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. ISED was included given its responsibility for SDTC.

The audit led to four recommendations, which have all been agreed to by the departments involved ISED and SDTC each had one applicable recommendation.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

There were no audits in 2017–18 requiring a response.

Up-front multi-year funding

General Information
Name of recipient Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation
Start date March 31, 2002
End date Ongoing
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Description

The Foundation supports research and disseminates research findings in the following humanities and social sciences: Canadian studies, history, international relations, journalism, law, peace and conflict studies, philosophy, political economy, political science, sociology, and urban and community studies.

Using a peer review process, the Foundation offers three types of awards: scholarships awarded to doctoral candidates, fellowships awarded to established researchers at Canadian universities, and mentorships awarded to seasoned professionals who are able to counsel the scholars. The Foundation also administers the Public Interaction Program (PIP), which communicates the work of the Foundation through conferences, lectures and symposia.

Comments on variances The Government of Canada provided the Foundation with $125 million in March 2002. No additional funding has been provided since that time.
Significant audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan A compliance audit was conducted in 2015–16.
Significant evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan The Foundation's next evaluation is expected to be completed by March 2019.
Summary of results achieved by the recipient

In 2017–18, the Trudeau Foundation:

  • Selected 15 new 2018 scholars;
  • Appointed ten 2018 mentors;
  • Appointed four 2018 fellows; and
  • Hosted seven public interaction events and supported nine other events.
Performance Information (dollars)
2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
0 0 0 0 0 0

General Information
Name of recipient Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) for the NextGen Biofuels Fund™
Start date April 1, 2007
End date Final project disbursements by March 31, 2017
Strategic Outcome Advancements in science and technology, knowledge and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy
Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity
Description SDTC manages the NextGen Biofuels Fund™ (NGBF), which was designed to provide conditionally repayable contributions toward first-of-kind, large-scale demonstration, next-generation renewable fuel production facilities. The NGBF is winding down, and no longer accepting applications.
Comments on variances Program has sunsetted in 2017–18 and funding for monitoring and operating costs for the NGBF was no longer required.
Significant audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan None planned or completed.
Significant evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year, and future plan The NGBF Funding Agreement identifies the need for interim evaluations at specific periods during the life of the fund. The Foundation agreed to conduct and submit to the Government of Canada three evaluations to be carried out by an independent third party. The second evaluation was made public on November 30, 2017.
Summary of results achieved by the recipient SDTC contributed $81.2 million to support four approved projects.
Performance Information (dollars)
2015–16
Actual spending
2016–17
Actual spending
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017–18 actual minus 2017–18 planned)
0 27,476,242 800,000 0 0 (800,000)
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