Departmental Results Report 2017–18

From: Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

This publication is available online at http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/017.nsf/eng/h_07615.html.

To obtain a copy of this publication, or to receive it in an alternate format (Braille, large print, etc.), please fill out the Publication Request Form or contact:

Web Services Centre
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
C.D. Howe Building
235 Queen Street
Ottawa, ON K1A 0H5
Canada

Telephone (toll-free in Canada): 1-800-328-6189
Telephone (international): 613-954-5031
TTY (for hearing impaired): 1-866-694-8389
Business hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time)
Email: ISED@Canada.ca

Permission to Reproduce

Except as otherwise specifically noted, the information in this publication may be reproduced, in part or in whole and by any means, without charge or further permission from the Department of Industry, provided that due diligence is exercised in ensuring the accuracy of the information reproduced; that the Department of Industry is identified as the source institution; and that the reproduction is not represented as an official version of the information reproduced, or as having been made in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of, the Department of Industry.

For permission to reproduce the information in this publication for commercial purposes, please fill out the Application for Crown Copyright Clearance or contact the Web Services Centre mentioned above.

© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of Industry, 2018

Cat. No. Iu1-23E-PDF
ISSN 2561-1658

Aussi offert en français sous le titre Rapport sur les résultats ministériels 2017-2018.

PDF version

Complete a survey on your experience using this Departmental Plan

Table of contents

Ministers' message

Photo of the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development
The Honourable
Navdeep Bains

Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development
Photo of the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science
The Honourable
Kirsty Duncan

Minister of Science and Sport
Photo of the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Tourism, Official Languages  and  La Francophonie
The Honourable
Mélanie Joly

Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie
Photo of the Honourable Mary Ng, Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion
The Honourable
Mary Ng
Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion

We are pleased to present the 2017–18 Departmental Results Report for Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada.

Over the past year, through integrated work across the various organizations of the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Portfolio, the Government of Canada worked very hard to improve Canada's global competitiveness while creating jobs, nurturing growth and strengthening our country's middle class.

In 2017-18, the Portfolio continued to implement the Innovation and Skills Plan to promote innovation and science, including support for scientific research and the commercialization of research and ideas. The Plan also encourages Canadian small businesses to grow, scale-up, and become more productive, more innovative and more export-oriented. An important area of this work included promoting increased tourism in Canada and the creation of new opportunities in our tourism sector. The Plan's overarching aim to position Canada as an innovation leader has been the driving focus of the Portfolio's programs.

The Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada is making great strides in its contributions to the Plan. These efforts have helped to support entrepreneurs and innovators in all regions of the country, by ensuring that Canadians have access to the training and skills they need, and by helping Canadian businesses innovate and promote sustainable growth. More specifically, in 2017-18 the Department delivered a number of high-profile programs to make Canadian industry more competitive, including the Innovation Superclusters Initiative, Innovative Solutions Canada, and the Strategic Innovation Fund.

In addition, significant progress was achieved in year-one of the implementation of Canada's Tourism Vision. Investments of over $1.3 billion in science, technology and innovation capacity benefitted thousands of researchers and students across the country.  This includes funding for the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund. The Government of Canada firmly believes in the importance of science to improve the well-being of Canadians, as underscored by the historic investment of nearly $4 billion in research and the next generation of researchers announced in Budget 2018. In addition, the Chief Science Advisor was also appointed to ensure that government science is fully available to the public, that scientists are able to speak freely about their work, and that scientific analyses are considered when the Government makes decisions. Furthermore, in preparation for the next steps of the Innovation and Skills Plan – announced in Budget 2018 – the Department began work on the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy, a comprehensive, whole-of-government plan to help women grow their businesses through access to financing, talent, networks and expertise.

Through deep collaborations and inclusive partnerships, the Innovation, Science and Economic Development Portfolio organizations have embarked on a shared journey to stronger, cleaner and more inclusive economic competitiveness that benefits all Canadians. This report documents the contributions that the Department is making towards this important work.

Results at a glance

What funds were used? (2017–18 Actual Spending) Who was involved? (2017–18 Actual Full-Time Equivalents)
$2,355,938,284 4,910

Implementing Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan

Launched in Budget 2017, the Innovation and Skills Plan responds to the mandate letter commitment to implement Canada's Innovation Agenda. Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) implemented several Innovation and Skills Plan initiatives, including the Innovation Superclusters Initiative, six Economic Strategy Tables, CanCode, the Strategic Innovation Fund, Innovative Solutions Canada, and the Innovation Canada one-stop shop for Canadian businesses. This work included extensive collaborations, which is essential in today's knowledge-based economy. For example, Canada's five superclusters represent collaboration between more than 450 businesses, including over 300 small and medium-sized enterprises, 60 post-secondary institutions and 180 other participants from across Canada's innovative industries.

Supporting scientific innovation and world-class research

ISED supported infrastructure projects to improve the facilities for research, innovation and specialized training at post-secondary institutions across the country through the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund and the Canada Foundation for Innovation's Innovation Fund that, combined, announced more than 200 projects in 2017-18. ISED also supported Canada's Chief Science Advisor, Dr. Mona Nemer, and her mandate to provide advice to the Minister of Science and members of Cabinet as appropriate and requested on key scientific issues.

Increasing high-speed broadband coverage

To better position Canadians in all regions of the country to take advantage of the opportunities afforded by the digital age, ISED will provide improved Internet speed and coverage to 739 rural and remote communities through the Connect to Innovate (CTI) program. As of March 31, 2018, 138 CTI projects have been announced, totalling $300 million in funding since the program's launch in December 2016, with $413 million of leveraged funds. High speed connectivity is critical to the prosperity and wellbeing of Canadians across the country, which is why ISED works closely with all of the provinces and territories to provide Canadians in rural and remote locations with access to high-speed Internet through CTI and to leverage funds so that the maximum number of communities can benefit from the CTI program.

Maintaining an efficient and competitive Canadian marketplace

ISED continued its role as a regulator in areas such as telecommunications, trade measurement, insolvency, federal incorporation and intellectual property to help maintain an open and efficient Canadian marketplace. Through Measurement Canada, ISED ensured the inspection of 153,400 gas pumps, scales and other measuring devices in 2017–18 in the eight sectors with mandatory re-inspection requirements. ISED also promoted competition through its investigations of anti-competitive behaviour, advocacy work and reviews of mergers and significant foreign investments to ensure they provide benefits to Canadian businesses and consumers. In 2017-18, this included the Competition Bureau taking legal action against key players in the car rental industry and ISED receiving and certifying a total of 743 notifications filed by foreign investors.

Supporting Canada's participation in trade agreements

To ensure Canadians can enjoy the benefits of increased trade and Canadian companies' preferential access to various global markets, ISED supported negotiations for various free trade agreements, including the North American Free Trade Agreement, the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, and negotiations towards free trade agreements with MERCOSUR and the Pacific Alliance. The Department also worked successfully with provincial and territorial officials to strengthen internal trade and reduce trade barriers within Canada. The Canadian Free Trade Agreement (CFTA) came into force on July 1, 2017 and is helping to achieve a modern and competitive economic union. The Department made significant strides in collaborating with provinces and territories through the CFTA's new processes and working groups.

Supporting small businesses and the tourism sector

The Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) helped businesses get access to loans that would otherwise not be available or would only be available under less favourable terms. In 2017–18, 5,901 loans worth $1.2 billion were registered with the CSBFP, with start-ups (i.e. businesses in operation for less than one year) receiving the majority of the loans (57 percent). The BizPaL service, led by ISED with collaboration between all levels of government, continued to facilitate access for entrepreneurs and business owners to the permits and licences they require to start and grow their businesses. In 2017-18, a BizPaL Restaurant Bundle project was implemented with Ontario in the Toronto area, providing local restauranteurs with a dashboard view of their compliance journey.

In 2017–18, ISED also implemented Canada's Tourism Vision, a five-year whole-of-government approach to support growth in the Canadian tourism sector. In its first year, the Vision accomplished several key milestones and progressed towards its overarching goals that will strengthen the industry and create prosperity and jobs. In 2017, Canada welcomed a new record high 20.8 million international tourists, surpassing the previous record of 20.1 million established in 2002 by 3.9%. Through the development of a strategic plan, ISED also launched the Canada-China Year of Tourism (CCYT) in 2018 which kicked off a series of events and activities that will strengthen people-to-people and business-to-business ties.

For more information on ISED's plans, priorities and results achieved, see the "Results: what we achieved" section of this report.

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être

Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (ISED) helps Canadian businesses grow, innovate and export so that they can create good quality jobs and wealth for Canadians. The Department works with provinces, territories, municipalities, the post-secondary education system, employers and labour to improve the quality and impact of its programs that support innovation, scientific research and entrepreneurship, in order to build a prosperous and innovative Canada. The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development is responsible for this organization.

Mandate and role

ISED helps Canadian businesses grow, innovate and expand so they can create good-quality jobs and wealth for Canadians. It also supports science research and the integration of scientific considerations into investment and policy choices. The Department helps small businesses grow through trade and innovation and promotes increased tourism in Canada. The Department also works to position Canada as a global centre for innovation where investments support clean and inclusive growth, the middle class prospers through more job opportunities and companies become global leaders.

ISED's efforts focus on improving conditions for investment, supporting science, helping small and medium-sized businesses grow, building capacity for clean and sustainable technologies and processes, increasing Canada's share of global trade, promoting tourism, and building an efficient and competitive marketplace.

For more general information about the department, see the "Supplementary information" section of this report. For more information on the department's organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Ministers' mandate letters.Footnote 1

Operating context and key risk

Operating context

Canada is in a global innovation race. As we enter a new era of global competition driven by the accelerating pace of economic and technological change in an increasingly digital world, Canada must continue to build on its strong base of talent, knowledge and entrepreneurship to be at the frontier of global innovation-led competitiveness and reap social and economic benefits for Canadians.

To this end, in 2017-18, ISED advanced Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan, a whole-of-government approach designed to propel Canada's innovation-led competitiveness. Developed in consultation with Canadians, the Innovation and Skills Plan focuses on four interconnected and mutually reinforcing themes to foster innovation through partnerships and targeted actions:

The following challenges continued to shape Canada's future as our country becomes more open and interconnected within the global community. However, these challenges can be leveraged into opportunities with the innovation necessary to create and secure good-quality jobs for Canadians.

Key risk

The challenges associated to economic uncertainties, disruptive technological developments and a global shift to clean growth continue to affect one of the Department's main risks, as identified in ISED's 2017-18 Departmental Plan. There is a risk that maintaining the status quo will result in insufficient investments in people, technology and companies to fuel innovation, thereby eroding Canada's ability to translate advancements into economic growth for all Canadians.

To address this risk, the Department is leading the implementation of Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan. Launched in Budget 2017 and following extensive consultations with Canadians, a number of the Plan's signature initiatives are now underway, including the Innovation Superclusters Initiative, six Economic Strategy Tables, CanCode, the Strategic Innovation Fund, Innovative Solutions Canada, and the Innovation Canada one-stop shop for Canadian businesses. These measures help ensure that Canadians have the skills they need to compete in a global economy and Canadian businesses are supported as they innovate and grow. Budget 2018 builds on these signature initiatives through the results of the horizontal review of business innovation programs. The review proposes a series of fundamental changes to business innovation programs to create a suite of programs that is easy to navigate and will respond to the challenges and opportunities facing Canadian businesses today and into the future. Budget 2018 also provided significant investments that support Canada's researchers and the new knowledge and innovations that they help create.

Key risk
Risk Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to the Department's programs Link to mandate letter commitments and any government wide or departmental priorities
Canada's economy may not generate the innovation necessary to drive sustainable growth.

In 2017–18, ISED continued to implement Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan, with measures designed to stimulate innovation and promote economic growth in all regions across the country.

While the Department does not control many of the external factors that influence sustainable growth, ISED consulted with stakeholders across Canada to help ensure that the Department's programming for innovation-led growth meets Canadians' needs and supports the continued growth of an innovative economy. The resulting Innovation and Skills Plan measures are designed to foster Canadian competitiveness, a key mitigation against external economic risk factors.

All Develop an Innovation Agenda

Results: what we achieved

Programs

Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations

Description

This program regulates and provides oversight over a number of aspects of the Canadian marketplace, including trade measurement, insolvency, corporate governance including federal incorporation, intellectual property, market access and consumer affairs. The program develops and administers framework statutes, regulations, policies and procedures; develops, sets and assures compliance with related regulatory reforms and standards; and consults with a variety of stakeholders and portfolio organizations. Overall, the program benefits Canadian businesses and consumers by ensuring the integrity of the marketplace and providing a competitive environment that contributes to Canada's innovation performance.

Results

To protect consumers, improve the accessibility of the Canadian marketplace and ensure that Canadian businesses were well-placed to compete both domestically and in the international market, in 2017–18 ISED continued its oversight and enforcement roles with respect to the Canadian marketplace.

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) continued to support the modernization of intellectual property (IP) legislation in order for Canada to accede to various international IP treaties. Public pre-consultations were completed in July 2017 for changes to the Trademarks Regulations and the Industrial Design Regulations. Both sets of regulations were then pre-published in the Canada Gazette, Part I for public comment in late 2017 and early 2018. The final version of the Industrial Design RegulationsFootnote 2 were published in spring 2018 and will come into force on November 5, 2018, when Canada formally accedes to the Hague Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Industrial Designs.

The final set of Trademarks Regulations are expected to be published in December 2018, and will come into force in spring or summer 2019, when Canada will accede to three international trademark treaties. Finally, CIPO held pre-consultations in September 2017 for changes to the Patent Rules and will publish them for public comment in late 2018.

As part of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), CIPO implemented an expanded geographical indication system to include agriculture and food products, effective September 21, 2017.

CIPO delivered an enhanced IP awareness and education program designed to provide businesses with tools and information to better acquire, manage and leverage their IP assets. CIPO also delivered a suite of seminars and training services for businesses and expanded its presence and partnerships in innovation-focused communities.

The Canadian Free Trade Agreement (CFTA) was announced by the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development along with provincial and territorial trade ministers on April 7, 2017, and came into force on July 1, 2017. On December 14, 2017, federal implementing legislation for the CFTA received Royal Assent. The agreement provides a framework to reduce and eliminate, to the extent possible, barriers to the free movement of persons, goods, services, and investments within Canada and establish an open efficient, and stable domestic market. In 2017–18, ISED also worked with provincial and territorial officials, and collaborated with Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat and other government departments to set up the various bodies and processes established by the CFTA, including the Regulatory Reconciliation and Cooperation Table, and a number of CFTA working groups, including those on Alcoholic Beverages, Northern Foods, Financial Services, and Trade in Fish and Fish Products.

In the area of international free trade, ISED collaborated with Global Affairs Canada, other government departments and industry stakeholders, including American industry representatives, on ongoing analysis and trade renegotiations for the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Department also contributed to the successful conclusion of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, which will give Canadian companies preferential access to markets in Asia.

ISED continued to lead and facilitate negotiations among the provinces and territories on a modernized Internet Sales Contract Harmonization Template (ISCHT). As the online marketplace has changed substantially since the ISCHT was adopted in 2001, a modernized agreement will ensure Canadian consumers enjoy the protections they expect when shopping online or at a distance. A harmonized approach to provincially-based consumer protection law also supports businesses that operate across provincial borders since it reduces compliance costs and regulatory burdens and provides regulatory predictability. In 2017–18, advancements were made towards a draft agreement and a draft document for public consultation.

To help protect consumers in the lending market, ISED worked with federal, provincial and territorial partners to better understand high-cost credit use. In particular, the Department commissioned a study on consumer use of such loans and circumstances of use. The results were disseminated to federal, provincial, and territorial partners to inform future policies to protect Canadian consumers.

Improving access to common business registry information

ISED continued collaborative work with participating jurisdictions on the development of a Business Registry Search pilot system.

Completion of Phase 1 of the pilot demonstrated data-sharing between the participating jurisdictions using real data in a test environment in order to facilitate multi-jurisdictional search, registration and notification.

The search functionality that this pilot successfully demonstrated is now being applied to a project that will connect Canada's business registries to increase transparency and sharing of information, and make extra-provincial/territorial registration and reporting more seamless and efficient for Canadian businesses.

To protect consumers and ensure the integrity and accuracy of trade measurement in Canada, ISED, through Measurement Canada, ensured the inspection of 153,400 gas pumps, scales and other measuring devices in 2017–18 in the eight sectors with mandatory re-inspection requirements. Measurement Canada continued to employ a graduated enforcement approach to correct measurement inaccuracy and other types of non-compliance, including issuing information and violation letters and requiring businesses to fix devices found in non-compliance. To promote compliance among device owners, Measurement Canada developed a fact sheet and a frequently asked questions infographic to explain the graduated enforcement approach.

In line with ISED's goal to deliver innovative, integrated client-centric digital services, the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy introduced an updated Insolvency Records Search (IRS) application to key stakeholders. The updated IRS service is designed to enhance access and increase usability and ease of navigation for clients.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Service standards are met Average percentage of service standards met 91.5% March 31, 2018 93% 94% 95%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
73,477,129 73,477,129 215,046,817 66,620,345 (6,856,783)

The Total Authorities Available for Use for this program in 2017–18 includes $169.5 million in unused authorities accumulated by CIPO since its creation in 1994. CIPO is an organization within the Department that is funded entirely from the revenues it generates, drawing from its unused authorities as required.

The variance between Planned Spending and Actual Spending is primarily due to a delay in the upgrades to CIPO's information technology infrastructure and greater than expected variance in deferred liabilities.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
1,801 1,769 (32)

Marketplace Competition and Investments

Description

This program administers federal laws relating to the investigation of anti-competitive behaviour and the general regulation of trade and commerce in respect of business practices, including the review of mergers and significant foreign investments. It protects, promotes and advocates for efficient markets in a manner that encourages ongoing economic growth and innovation, providing consumers and businesses with competitive prices and increased product choices.

Results

To build confidence in the digital economy and ensure an innovative and competitive marketplace in Canada, ISED, through the Competition Bureau, used enforcement, outreach and advocacy to increase compliance with Canada's competition laws, prevent and deter anti-competitive conduct, ensure mergers do not substantially lessen or prevent competition, and stop deceptive marketing practices that threaten the growth of the Canadian economy and consumer confidence.

The Bureau's case against the Toronto Real Estate Board (TREB)Footnote 3, which was upheld by the Federal Court of Appeal on December 1st, 2017, set a precedent for putting digital innovation first. It was found that TREB had blocked its members from offering certain online brokerage services, preventing home buyers and sellers from taking advantage of a wide range of options when making one of the most significant financial transactions of their lives. By lifting restrictions on access and use of real estate data, agents will be able to offer consumers innovative services that provide insights into home sales prices and trends online.

The Bureau also worked to strengthen Canadians' trust that prices advertised online are ones they will actually pay. That trust is easily broken when online retailers add hidden fees and charges to products and services. In 2017-18, the Bureau took on key players in the car rental industry over hidden fees, resulting in a total of $2.25 million in administrative monetary penalties for Hertz/Dollar ThriftyFootnote 5 and Enterprise Rent-A-CarFootnote 3.

Understanding big data's policy impacts

The amount of data being used to drive innovation and quality improvements across many industries has grown exponentially, but this also introduces many challenges for competition law enforcement.

In September 2017, the Bureau published a discussion paper on big data to spark dialogue on how to address these challenges in ways that support innovation and competition. This work was recognized by the International Anti-trust Writing Awards as one of the top "Soft Law" publications of 2017.

The discussion paper informed the release of a final report outlining themes and considerations relevant to enforcement analysis of anti-competitive conduct and deceptive marketing practices in Canada.

In January 2018, as part of a class-action settlement related to false environmental marketing claims by Volkswagen, Audi and Porsche, buyers and lessees of certain 3.0 litre diesel vehicles were awarded up to $290.5 million in compensation. Footnote 6 The Bureau also reached a consent agreement with the three Canadian automobile distributors. Volkswagen Canada and Audi Canada committed to paying a total administrative monetary penalty of $2.5 million.

As part of continued efforts to preserve competition in the retail gas industry, the Bureau reached separate consent agreements with Alimentation Couche-Tard Inc. and Parkland Industries Ltd.Footnote 7 These agreements related to Couche-Tard's proposed merger with CST Brands Inc. and its decision to sell a number of retail gasoline sites and dealer contracts to Parkland. As these mergers and acquisitions would have resulted in decreased competition in certain local markets, the Bureau stepped in to address the competition concerns in this important sector.

In December 2017, the Bureau published a market study of innovation in the financial services industry (FinTech). Footnote 8 Focused on emerging FinTech services in retail payment systems, peer-to-peer lending and equity crowdfunding, and investment dealing and advice, the study provides policymakers and regulators with 30 recommendations on how to promote greater competition and innovation in financial services.

In April 2017, the Bureau launched a dedicated tip line that allows the public to report suspected instances of fraud, collusion or corruption affecting federal government contracts, helping build trust in government procurement.Footnote 9 In its first year, the Bureau received 140 tips through the telephone tip line and online form. This joint initiative with Public Services and Procurement Canada and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police complements measures already in place to ensure that federal contracts are lawful, ethical, and fair.

The Bureau also worked to ensure that consumers are well-informed and confident in their buying decisions. To help consumers recognize, reject and report fraud, the Bureau participated in the Fraud Prevention Month campaign in March 2018. In addition to participating in awareness campaigns like the Top 10 Scams, and the #fraudchat and #2G2BT Twitter chats, the Bureau launched the second edition of The Little Black Book of Scams, a guide that exposes 12 of the most prevalent scams in Canada.Footnote 10

The Department also continued to monitor and review in-bound foreign investments into Canada. In 2017–18, ISED received and certified 743 notifications filed by foreign investors. ISED also provided the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development with the information required to help determine the likely net benefit to Canada of various proposed investments. In 2017–18, 10 applications for review were filed and certified, of which the Minister approved nine applications, with one of the applications blocked under Part IV.1 national security provisions.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Consumers benefit from a competitive marketplace Dollar value estimate of annual consumer savings from Bureau actions that stop anti-competitive activity $3.99 billion March 31, 2018 $2.8 billion $2.7 billion $2.9 billion
Anticipated total consumer savings for the duration of the remedy from Bureau actions that stop anti-competitive activity $17.17 billion March 31, 2018 $18.7 billion $15.2 billion N/A*
Timely and accurate reviews lead to marketplace certainty Percentage of mergers and foreign investments reviewed within service standards 85% for complex matters and 90% for non-complex matters (for merger reviews) March 31, 2018
  • Complex matters: 86%
  • Non-complex matters: 96%
  • Complex matters: 74%
  • Non-complex matters: 99%
  • Complex reviews: 85%
  • Non-complex reviews: 96%

* New indicator for 2016-17.

The variance between the target and actual results for the dollar value estimate of annual consumer savings from Bureau actions that stop anti-competitive activity is due to the difficulty in anticipating whether and how quickly complex investigations will conclude.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
41,903,401 41,903,401 43,078,858 43,359,615 3,456,214
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
351 339 (12)

Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Digital Economy

Description

This program enables Canadians to benefit from a globally competitive digital economy that drives innovation, productivity and future prosperity. This includes developing and administering domestic regulations, procedures and standards that govern Canada's radiocommunication and telecommunications industries. The program sets legislative and policy frameworks to encourage competition, innovation, private sector investment in digital infrastructure, confidence in the online marketplace, and greater adoption of information and communications technologies by business. The program maximizes the public benefits of spectrum by managing it efficiently and effectively, through spectrum and radio licensing including auctions, compliance and enforcement. The program protects Canadian interests in the radiocommunications and telecommunications industry globally and facilitates international online trade and commerce by negotiating international treaties and agreements. This program also performs research in advanced telecommunication and information technologies to promote innovation and assist in the development of policies, regulations and program delivery.

Results

In 2017–18, ISED continued to ensure Canadians benefitted from the digital economy, in part through the administration of policies and regulations governing the radiocommunication and telecommunications industries. The Department also continued to manage spectrum and radio licensing to the benefit of all Canadians and conduct research on advanced communications systems and technologies to inform public policy and further innovation.

ISED is committed to delivering on Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan by ensuring that Canada has a world-class telecommunications infrastructure and that Canadian consumers, businesses and public institutions continue to benefit from advanced wireless telecommunications services and applications.

With this goal in mind, ISED published the following consultations and decisions in 2017-18:

On May 8, 2017, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development opened the Communication Research Centre Canada's (CRC) Big Data Analytics Centre. Using big data analytics, cloud computing, crowdsourced information, data fusion and state-of-the-art visualization, the Centre enables researchers to work with big data in ways that were previously not possible to support sustainable spectrum management.

Enabling new, innovative applications of wireless technologies

In 2017-18, ISED deployed, under the CRC's Grand Challenges research program, a collaborative 5G Test Site at Ottawa City Hall. The implementation of 5G will impact every aspect of society, allowing billions of devices to connect better and faster.

The CRC used the 5G Test Site to successfully demonstrate how low-cost engineered surfaces developed by the CRC can enhance 5G coverage in a real-world environment without the use of additional base stations.

The Test Site will continue to be used by the CRC to move this research forward, and will continue to be made available to Canadian innovators to use the facility for their own research and showcase 5G wireless applications in Ottawa.

ISED supported proposals to ensure the efficient operations of the International Telecommunications Union's Telecommunications Standardization Sector, and facilitated private sector contributions to establish new international standards. As a result, Canadians will benefit from standards that support secure and reliable communication while protecting personal data and privacy, and enable the growth of Canadian companies looking to export their innovation in markets abroad.

The Connecting Families initiativeFootnote 11 connects low-income Canadian households with Internet service providers offering low-cost Internet solutions, and provides these households with free refurbished computers through the Computers for Schools program. In 2017–18, an agreement was signed with Computers for Success Canada to develop a web portal to connect households with participating Internet service providers. The program will provide hundreds of thousands of Canadian families with low-cost Internet and up to 50,000 computers for eligible households.

The Accessible Technology programFootnote 12 supports the development of assistive and adaptive technology for people with disabilities. Projects are co-funded with for-profit, not-for-profit or academic organizations with the objective of enabling people with disabilities to fully engage with digital technology. The program launched in December 2017 and has received 30 applications to date.

As a companion to the CanCodeFootnote 13 and Accessible Technology programs, the Digital Literacy Exchange programFootnote 14 launched on February 19, 2018 and 151 applications were received by the March 30, 2018 deadline. The Digital Literacy Exchange program supports fundamental digital literacy skills training with a focus on under-represented groups to promote participation in the digital economy.

The Digital Skills for Youth programFootnote 15 is a component of the Government's Youth Employment Strategy horizontal initiative. It provides under-employed youth with digital skills training, soft skills training and work-integrated learning experience using a third party delivery model that connects youth with Canadian not-for-profit organizations and small businesses. The program was announced on January 4, 2018, and 22 applications were received by the February 7, 2018 deadline.

On September 2, 2017, the Government of Canada published draft regulations that specify how organizations must notify individuals when they are victims of data breaches that pose a real risk of significant harm. Comments received on the draft regulations were addressed in the final regulations, which were published on April 18, 2018.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Canada has a growing digital economy Investment in dollars by telecommunications providers $8 billion

March 31, 2018

$11.8 billion (2016)*

$13.3 billion (2015)

$14.7 billion (2014)

Percentage of population with broadband subscriptions 83%

March 31, 2018

84% (2016)

82% (2015)

80% (2014)

* Larger figures for investment in 2015 and 2016 due to wireless spectrum auctions. Excluding investments made in spectrum, total investment would be $10.4 billion (2015) and $11.6 billion (2016).

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

98,327,554

98,327,554

108,138,900

112,498,906

14,171,352

The variance between Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending is primarily due to new funding for the Public Safety Broadband Network and the Prime Minister's Teaching Awards, intellectual property royalties received, the reprofiling of funds from the 2014 and 2016 Federal Infrastructure Initiatives, internal realignments and the implementation of new collective agreements.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

715

677

(38)

Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Description

This program sets the strategic direction for policies and programs that support and stimulate research, development and innovation in Canada. In collaboration with portfolio partners, other government departments and external stakeholders from the private and public sectors, the program fosters an environment that is conducive to innovation and promotes scientific excellence.

Results

Launched in Budget 2017, the Innovation and Skills Plan responds to the mandate letter commitment to implement Canada's Innovation Agenda. As a result of the input received from broad consultations with Canadians, a number of signature initiatives from the Plan are now underway, including the Innovation Superclusters Initiative, six Economic Strategy Tables, CanCode, the Strategic Innovation Fund, Innovative Solutions Canada, and the Innovation Canada one-stop shop for Canadian businesses.

Clean Growth Hub

In January 2018, the Clean Growth Hub was officially launched as the Government of Canada's focal point for clean technology businesses.Footnote 16

The Hub is focused on helping clean technology producers and users identify the federal programs and supports most relevant to their needs, as well as coordinating existing federal programs to better support clean technology companies and tracking the results of this support.

In 2017-18, the Hub provided advisory services to just over 300 clean technology clients.

On May 24, 2017, following consultations with stakeholders across the country that included a series of roundtables on innovation, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development launched the Innovation Superclusters Initiative, a $950 million initiative to support business-led consortia with bold and ambitious proposals to strengthen Canada's most promising clusters and build superclusters at scale.Footnote 17

The process to select these superclusters consisted of a Letter of Intent phase in which more than 50 applications representing over 1,000 businesses and 350 other organizations from all regions of Canada were received. A shortlist of nine candidates was announced on October 12, 2017, and the final selection of the following five superclusters was announced by the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development on February 15, 2018: the Ocean Supercluster (Atlantic Canada), the AI-Powered Supply Chains Supercluster (SCALE.AI) (Quebec), the Advanced Manufacturing Supercluster (Ontario), the Protein Industries Supercluster (Prairie Provinces) and the Digital Technology Supercluster (British Columbia).

Canada's five superclusters represent collaboration between more than 450 businesses, including over 300 small and medium-sized enterprises, 60 post-secondary institutions and 180 other participants from across Canada's innovative industries. They are forecast to generate over $50 billion to Canada's gross domestic product and create an estimated minimum of 50,000 jobs over the next 10 years.

On September 26, 2017, the Prime Minister announced the appointment of Dr. Mona Nemer as Canada's new Chief Science Advisor (CSA). Through the Office of the CSA, ISED supports Dr. Nemer's mandate to provide impartial scientific advice on topics such as ensuring that government science is fully available to the public and that scientific analyses are considered when the government makes decisions. On January 31, 2018, the CSA wrote to the Prime Minister and Minister of Science, reporting on her first 100 days in office.Footnote 18 The letter highlights the engagement and outreach activities undertaken by the CSA, some observations about the current state of government science and plans for the coming year.

In June 2017, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) made award decisions under the 2017 Innovation Fund, investing more than $554 million in 117 new infrastructure projects at 61 universities, colleges and research hospitals across Canada. The CFI also continued to run competitions under the John R. Evans Leaders Fund, the College-Industry Innovation Fund and the Cyberinfrastructure Initiative.

The Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund (PSI-SIF) continued to implement projects to improve the scale, quality and environmental sustainability of facilities for research, innovation and specialized training at post-secondary institutions across the country.Footnote 19 The program announced 98 new projects in 2017–18, bringing the total number of PSI-SIF projects to 299. Considering that some projects have faced unforeseen delays, PSI-SIF was granted a seven-month extension changing the substantial completion date for eligible projects from April 30, 2018 to November 30, 2018.

On April 10, 2017, the Independent Advisory Panel that oversaw the Fundamental Science Review (FSR) released its report. In response, ISED supported the implementation of measures to improve Canada's research ecosystem, including: the launch of the Canada Research Coordinating Committee to strengthen coordination and governance of government support for researchFootnote 20 ; measures to improve equity, diversity and inclusion in science in federally funded research chair programs; a cap on renewals of Tier One Canada Research Chairs to ensure that emerging researchers have the opportunity to hold one of these prestigious positions; and a commitment to replace the existing Science, Technology and Innovation Council with a new science and innovation advisory body that will provide independent, expert advice and public reports.

With respect to Open Science—which is intended to maximize access to federally funded scientific research to encourage greater collaboration and engagement with the scientific community, the private sector, and the public—a draft Statement of Principles on Open Access to Publications Supported through Grants and Contributions has been shared within the federal Open Science community. The Department will continue to refine the Statement of Principles in 2018–19.

In December 2017, Statistics Canada released data showing how clean technologies and environmental goods and services benefit the Canadian economy. This is part of the Clean Technology Data Strategy developed by Natural Resources Canada and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada to improve data on clean technology development and use in Canada. The Data Strategy is the foundation for collecting and measuring the economic, environmental, and social impacts of clean technology in Canada and will help industry and government understand the clean technology landscape.

The Strategy consists of three pillars:

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17Actual results 2015–16
Actual results
Canada's scientific research excellence is maintained Canada's Average Relative Citation index

1.35*

March 31, 2018

1.41

1.40 (2015 data)

1.37 (2014 data)

Researchers are attracted to Canada, and retained Total full-time equivalent researchers in Canada per thousand total employment

8.8

March 31, 2018

9.1 (2015 data)

9.3 (2014 data)**

8.8 (2013 data)**

* The target for Canada's Average Relative Citation index is set using a three-year moving average, as the expected result is to maintain Canada's scientific research excellence. Therefore, the target is lower than some previous actual results.

** This data is collected and compiled by Statistics Canada and could contain estimates that undergo revisions over time. The data presented here is consistent with the information available at the time the target was set.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
342,834,370 342,834,370 1,198,477,652 1,197,358,867 854,524,497

The variance between Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending is primarily related to new funding for the Innovation Superclusters Initiative (some of which was unspent), Innovative Solutions Canada and various other transfer payment programs, as well as a reprofiling of funds for PSI-SIF to future years and a lapse by Sustainable Development Technology Canada.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned
2017–18
Actual
2017–18
Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

98

117

19

The variance between Planned and Actual full-time equivalents is primarily due to the creation of the Innovative Superclusters Initiative.

Industrial Research and Development Financing

Description

This program helps Canadian businesses increase research and development activities by investing in innovative projects and collaborations through repayable and non-repayable contributions. Projects supported under this program are expected to produce benefits to Canada, including generating strategic research and development investment, developing new technologies, and enhancing Canadian innovation capacity and expertise.

Results

In 2017–18, ISED continued investing in research and development activities to encourage the development of new technologies in targeted industries and to enhance innovative Canadian products and processes.

Investing in Regional Innovation and Development

In 2017–18, ISED continued to support the ministerial mandate letter commitment to work with the Regional Development Agencies to pursue strategic investments that build on regional advantages and support economic diversification where appropriate through the development and launch of the Investing in Regional Innovation and Development national framework.Footnote 21

In alignment with the Innovation and Skills Plan, the framework's priorities include:

  • strengthening regional innovation ecosystems and supporting regional clusters;
  • assisting businesses in scaling up and becoming world-class players;
  • investing in clean technology, and;
  • implementing regional growth strategies with local targets.

The Strategic Innovation Fund (SIF) was launched in July 2017. Footnote 22 Budget 2017 provided funding of $1.26 billion over five years to consolidate four existing programs—the Automotive Innovation Fund (AIF), Automotive Supplier Innovation Program (ASIP), Strategic Aerospace and Defence Initiative (SADI) and Technology Demonstration Program (TDP)—while also extending funding to other sectors of the economy. SIF provides funding in four streams to support innovative Canadian businesses: accelerating technology transfer and commercialization; facilitating growth and expansion; attracting and retaining large scale investments; advancing industrial research, development and technology demonstration. In 2017-18, a total of 14 projects were approved, including – on January 15, 2018 – the first project announced under the new SIF program. New projects included investments in automotive innovation, R&D and innovation that will result in more environmentally friendly chemical production and next-generation wireless technology.

ISED continues to collect repayments from SADI and Technology Partnerships Canada (TPC) recipients. So far, SADI repayments have totalled $319.6 million. Repayments under the TPC program have totalled $1.72 billion.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target* Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
* Program start dates in parentheses.
Investment in leading-edge R&D in targeted Canadian industries Dollar value to date of disbursements to firms for R&D activities

AIF (2008):
$476.3 million

ASIP (2015):
$44.7 million

SADI (2007):
$1.40 billion

TDP (2013):
$67.4 million

TPC (1996):
$3.16 billion

March 31, 2018

AIF: $387.6 million

ASIP: $20.7 million

SADI: $1.53B

TDP: $65.6M

TPC: $3.16B

AIF: $367.25 million

ASIP: $18.5 million

SADI: $1.23 billion

TDP: $46 million

TPC: $3.16 billion

AIF:
$342 million

ASIP:
$4.03 million

SADI:
$1 billion

TDP:
$15 million

TPC:
$3.16 billion

Dollars to date of investment leveraged per dollar of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada disbursements in R&D projects

AIF (2008):
$7.25

ASIP (2015):
$1.00

SADI (2007):
$1.82

TDP (2013):
$1.00

TPC (1996):
$2.33

March 31, 2018

AIF: $7.03

ASIP: $1.05

SADI: $1.75

TDP: $1.00

TPC: $2.33

AIF: $7.21

ASIP: $1.07

SADI: $1.79

TDP: $1.00

TPC: $2.33

AIF: $7.08

ASIP: $1.00

SADI: $1.82

TDP: Nil

TPC: $2.33

The variance between the target and actual result for the dollar value of disbursement under AIF, ASIP and TDP is attributed to spending delays from certain projects that received funding through these programs. The variance related to the actual results for the amount of investment leveraged by AIF is due to the timing of when claims are submitted for reimbursement of project-related eligible costs, as well as the associated percentage of the leveraged amount. For SADI, the variance is due to some of the larger SADI projects, which also had lower leveraged percentages than the average project, having been terminated prior to completion.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

359,430,758

359,430,758

412,030,007

394,993,951

35,563,193

The variance between Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending is primarily due to new funding received for SIF and the consolidation of the legacy programs.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

50

52

2

Small Business Research, Financing and Services

Description

This program enhances the growth and competitiveness of small business and encourages entrepreneurial activity across Canada. It raises awareness across government of the challenges facing small businesses and provides knowledge and expertise on small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in a number of areas, including entrepreneurship, financing, innovation, and growth firms. It also addresses obstacles to growth such as paperwork burden and delivers programs that help support SMEs.

Results

In 2017–18, ISED continued to support SMEs across the country to help them grow and become more internationally competitive. The Department also conducted outreach activities to promote its services to businesses and to engage with provincial, territorial, and municipal governments to align complementary services supporting entrepreneurs and SMEs.

The Canada Small Business Financing Program (CSBFP) helps businesses get access to loans that would otherwise not be available or would only be available under less favourable terms.Footnote 23 In 2017–18, 5,901 loans worth $1.2 billion were registered with the CSBFP, an increase of 12 percent and 23 percent, respectively, relative to last year. Start-ups (i.e. businesses in operation for less than one year) received the majority of the loans (57 percent). Accommodation and food services and retail trade were the two largest industry sectors, representing 53 percent of the loans in 2017-18.

To increase the efficiency of the CSBFP and make it easier for SMEs to access the capital they need, ISED continued to encourage the use of the online loan registration application and direct deposit payment initiative. As of March 31, 2018, 96 percent of the loans and registration fees and 100 percent of the claims and refund payments were being processed electronically.

Facilitating access to business permits and licences

The BizPaL service, led by ISED, is a unique collaboration between all levels of government, facilitating access for entrepreneurs and business owners to the permits and licences they require to start and grow their businesses.

Following BizPaL's Restaurant Bundle pilot project with British Columbia in 2016–17, Ontario implemented an additional innovative bundle in the Toronto area in 2017–18.

This new BizPaL feature provides local restauranteurs with a dashboard view of their progress through the process of acquiring their required permits, inspections, and licences. It also provides an up-to-date tally of wait times and potential costs that help restauranteurs plan and budget efficiently. Additionally, users can see the optimal order in which to pursue permits and licences and share their progress via a reporting tool.

In 2017-18, there were close to 700 user sessions for this bundle pilot and early numbers for 2018-19 show that use of the bundle is on track to surpass 2017-18 numbers, with more municipalities across Canada showing interest in joining the pilot.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
* For the calendar year 2014 (the survey is completed every three years).

Canadian small and medium sized-enterprises grow and become more internationally competitive

The percentage of businesses expecting to grow their total revenues over the next three years

77%

November 30, 2019

N/A

N/A

77%*

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

84,501,977

84,501,977

82,514,300

80,232,379

(4,269,598)

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

119

147

28

The variance between Planned and Actual full-time equivalents is primarily due to the transfer of the Accelerated Growth Service to this program and new digital transformation activities.

Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity

Description

This program helps Canadian industries increase their competitiveness in global markets and improve their capacity for developing and marketing innovative products and services. The program develops expertise on Canadian firms and sectors through research and analysis and engagement with associations, governments and leading firms. It applies this expertise to develop and contribute to policy, legislation and regulations aimed at strengthening the contribution of industry to Canada's innovation performance and economic well-being. This program collaborates with the private sector on industry development; attracts investment and promotes Canadian expertise; and advances initiatives for increasing productivity and supporting growth.

Results

In 2017–18, ISED continued to strengthen the manufacturing sector to foster globally competitive industries, while creating jobs and economic growth.

The Department undertook several policy, research and programming initiatives to help maintain and attract future investments in a number of key sectors, including aerospace, automotive, digital technologies and life sciences. ISED also conducted analysis and policy development in areas of the Canadian economy such as manufacturing, life sciences, and consumer products. This included significant undertakings in the areas of steel, aluminum and US tariffs, and inputs into the NAFTA negotiations.

Progress of Canada's Tourism Vision

In 2017, Canada welcomed a new record high 20.8 million international tourists, surpassing the previous record of 20.1 million established in 2002 by 3.9%. This tourism performance was in part due to celebrations marking the 150th anniversary of Canada's Confederation.

Additionally, there was progress on a number of action items:

  • Mexican visa restrictions have been lifted and, as a result, Mexican tourists account for the fastest growing tourist market, with a 24.8% increase in the first quarter of 2018 over 2017;
  • Transport Canada legislation on modernizing the air traveller experience, including a passenger bill of rights, received Royal Assent in May 2018;
  • 32 Indigenous tourism businesses participated in Rendez-vous Canada 2017 in Calgary;
  • The Government of Canada opened seven new visa application centres in China in 2017;
  • ISED provided funding to support LGBTQ2 representation at tourism trade shows as well as the development and delivery of six inclusion training sessions across the country. These sessions resulted in over 140 LGBTQ2-certified "inclusive" tourism businesses.

In collaboration with both internal and external partners, a key focus has been on conducting research to help inform policy and programming in areas such as cybersecurity, innovative technologies, and artificial intelligence.

ISED used its expertise in various industrial sectors to support the development of targeted pitches for foreign direct investment by Global Affairs Canada and the Trade Commissioner Service. It has developed printed pitch products and industry-specific key messages that have been used by the Trade Commissioner Service in meetings with a number of key stakeholders.

The Department established the Economic Strategy Tables to support innovation and growth in advanced manufacturing, agri-food, clean technology, digital industries, health/bio-sciences and resources of the future. In February 2018, the six Tables published interim reports that identify priority themes to help ensure that Canada is innovative to its greatest capacity.Footnote 24

In 2017–18, ISED implemented Canada's Tourism Vision, a five-year whole-of-government approach to support growth in the Canadian tourism sector.Footnote 25 Tourism is a major driver of Canada's economy, is Canada's number one employer of youth, and is an important provider of employment for new Canadians. In its first year, the Vision accomplished several key milestones.

Through the development of a strategic plan, ISED launched the Canada-China Year of Tourism (CCYT) in 2018 which kicked off a series of events and activities that will strengthen people-to-people and business-to-business ties. Footnote 26 In 2017-18, ISED worked with the Chinese government and Destination Canada to design a common logo for the CCYT, which was launched in China by the Prime Minister and Chinese Premier in December 2017.

ISED, in partnership with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, commissioned a study of the culinary tourism sector in Canada.

ISED also continued to collaborate with its provincial and territorial partners in growing the competitiveness of Canada's tourism sector through the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Tourism Strategy under the 2016 Nunavut Declaration.

The Industrial and Technological Benefits (ITB) Policy is Canada's principal tool to leverage economic benefits from defence procurement. It requires the winning bidder on defence and major Canadian Coast Guard contracts to undertake business activities in Canada at least equal to the value of the contract. In 2017, $1.8 billion in additional ITB obligations were added to the ITB portfolio, which has grown to $43.8 billion since 1986.

To inform its decision-making under the Defence Procurement Strategy, Canada relies on a combination of in-house research and analysis, industry consultations, and third-party expertise. In support of this need, ISED launched a request for proposal (RFP) for defence sector research and analysis. The Department also improved its own procedures for analyzing collected data, allowing the branch to provide more detailed reports on new ITB commitments, particularly in relation to SME and R&D content.

In addition to expanding its data analytic capabilities, ISED reached key milestones on major upcoming procurements. RFPs were issued on the Canadian Surface Combatant project, Canada's largest acquisition to date and which will help to drive innovation and growth for years to come, while greatly strengthening the Canadian shipbuilding industry. The Department also began industry engagement on the Future Fighter Capability Project, meeting with firms across Canada to discuss industrial participation in the procurement and develop a strategy for leveraging economic benefits that will support innovation, grow the economy, and create middle-class jobs in Canada.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Canadian industries have the capacity to prepare for and respond to risks and opportunities in domestic and global markets

Canada's ranking among G7 countries for "value chain breadth"

6th

March 31, 2018

7th

7th

7th

Canada's ranking among G7 countries for "firm-level technology absorption"

6th

March 31, 2018

5th

5th

6th

The variance between the Target and Actual result for the indicator, "Canada's ranking among G7 countries for 'value chain breadth" is due to the fact that, although Canada's overall score improved, it remained behind Italy in the G7-specific ranking.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

35,618,706

35,618,706

37,090,097

36,987,511

1,368,805

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

210

231

21

The variance between Planned and Actual full-time equivalents is primarily due to the creation of the Economic Strategy Tables.

Community Economic Development

Description

This program advances the economic development of Northern Ontario communities in the same manner that regional development agencies support similar activities in other regions of Canada. Its main goal is to strengthen the Northern Ontario economy by providing financial support through contribution agreements for economic and community development projects led by the private, not-for-profit and public sectors, including support for official language minority communities. This program also contributes to improving the availability of broadband Internet access across Canada and provides computers for schools and not-for-profit organizations.

Results

In 2017–18, ISED continued to deliver the Connecting Canadians program, which provides improved broadband coverage to rural and remote regions so that Canadians can participate in the digital economy no matter where they live. Of the 87 projects approved under the program as of March 31, 2018, 30 are complete, while the remainder are planned for completion by March 31, 2019. In total, the program is expected to provide high-speed broadband coverage to 300,000 households, exceeding the original target of 280,000.

Computers for Schools

In 2017–18, the Computers for Schools programFootnote 27 refurbished 76,653 computers and distributed them to schools and not-for-profit organizations, Indigenous communities, eligible low-income families, seniors and new Canadians.

In the past 25 years, Computers for Schools has refurbished more than 1.5 million computers, reducing the environmental impact of electronic waste, and distributed them across all provinces and territories.

Budget 2018 provided ongoing funding for the program, which is refining its donation strategy and expanding its mandate to include newer technologies, such as tablets and smartphones.

Building on the success of Connecting Canadians, the Department also implemented the new Connect to Innovate (CTI) program, which will bring high-speed Internet to a further 900 rural and remote communities by 2021, an increase to the initial target of 300. Footnote 28 This program supports new backbone infrastructure to connect institutions like schools and hospitals with a portion of funding for upgrades and last-mile infrastructure to households and businesses. As of March 31, 2018, 138 CTI projects have been announced, totalling $300 million in funding.

The Technical Work Experience Program (TWEP) is a companion program to Computers for Schools. It provides students and recent graduates with paid, practical work experience in refurbishment centres across Canada. In 2017–18, 261 interns were hired through the program, which is considered a part of the Youth Employment Strategy. One challenge the program has faced is low female participation. TWEP partners are developing a strategy to encourage more female applicants and have set a hiring target of 20 percent female youth interns in 2018–19. In 2017-18, 16 percent of interns hired were female youth.

In 2017–18, through the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario (FedNor), ISED led the development of the Prosperity and Growth Strategy for Northern Ontario, an economic development roadmap for the region aligned with Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan.Footnote 29 This process included extensive engagement efforts with approximately 1,000 key stakeholders to ensure the strategy will effectively address issues important to Canadians living and working in Northern Ontario. With the results of these consultations, FedNor is working with federal and provincial partners on issues and opportunities identified by stakeholders.

FedNor, along with the other regional development agencies, refocused its programming to align with the Government of Canada's Innovation and Skills Plan. This helped to meet the specific outcomes for regional development agencies and resulted in funding application approvals focused on strong results for Northern Ontario including those promoting the growth of Indigenous communities.

ISED also delivered the final year of the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program in Northern Ontario, which celebrated Canada's 150th anniversary through the rehabilitation or improvement of existing community infrastructure assets and facilities. In 2017–18, FedNor authorized $2.9 million for 43 projects, which leveraged $5.0 million in additional funding.

Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Targeted businesses and organizations in Northern Ontario create economic growth Number of Northern Ontario businesses created, expanded or maintained with FedNor assistance 1,700 March 31, 2018

1,504

1,776

2,313

The variance between the target and actual result for the number of Northern Ontario businesses created, expanded or maintained with FedNor assistance is due to the fact that ISED supports long-term, multi-year projects in Northern Ontario and that the types of projects funded are often influenced by regional, national and sometimes global economic factors. In this context, longer-term trends are emphasized rather than specific results in a given fiscal year.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

213,105,186

213,105,186

221,867,323

124,776,980

(88,328,206)

The variance between Planned Spending and Actual Spending is primarily due to unforeseen delays in a certain number of the private-sector led projects that are supported under the Connect to Innovate and Connecting Canadians programs. As a result, program recipients did not request their entire allotted funding as expected in 2017-18. Of the lapsed funding, a total of $83.6 will be reprofiled to future years (Connect to Innovate: $70.9M, Connecting Canadians: $12.7M).

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

114

116

2

Information on ISED's lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase.Footnote 30

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

ISED's internal services provide behind-the-scenes support for the Department's programs in areas such as human resources, financial management and information technology to ensure the efficient and effective delivery of programs to benefit Canadians.

ISED continued to implement its Innovation 2020 agenda, which is the Department's approach to public service renewal and is inspired by the Blueprint 2020 vision. The agenda includes activities in three areas: creating an agile workforce, ensuring sound stewardship and instilling a culture of openness and transparency by adopting an 'operating as one' work style.

HR-to-Pay Stabilization efforts

ISED collaborated with central agencies and other federal departments on HR-to-Pay Stabilization efforts.

The Department also hosts periodic meetings with heads of human resources from the ISED Portfolio organizations, to share information and tools, and seek opportunities for collaboration.

ISED also established a Portfolio and Intergovernmental Engagement Secretariat (PIES) in 2017–18 to support horizontal collaboration among the ISED Portfolio organizations and cross-Portfolio alignment with the Innovation and Skills Plan.

To give employees improved and more efficient access to the information they need to do their jobs, ISED continued to implement the GCDOCS file management system and more than 60 percent of departmental employees have access to the system.

In fall 2017, the Digital Office Transformation Program was initiated to leverage the Workplace 2.0 office environment by untethering employees through new digital tools and capabilities. The Digital Office is being implemented through five streams:

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

152,780,251

152,780,251

187,833,143

180,989,728

28,209,477

The variance between Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending is due to additional funding received during the year, including the operating budget carry forward to support unfunded priorities and compensation adjustments as a result of collective bargaining.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

1,417

1,462

45

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph
Departmental spending trend graph (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure: Departmental spending trend graph
Departmental spending trend graph (dollars)
Category 2015-16 2016-17 2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21
Sunset Programs - Anticipated 0 0 0 5,400,000 5,400,000 5,400,000
Statutory 171,999,686 210,024,024 155,481,757 194,935,684 179,589,382 173,839,191
Voted 997,834,811 1,876,889,761 2,200,456,525 2,709,945,754 1,964,283,991 1,608,097,440
Total 1,169,834,497 2,086,913,785 2,355,938,282 2,910,281,438 2,149,273,373 1,787,336,631

The increase in spending since 2016–17 is mainly explained by funding for the Post-Secondary Institution Strategic Investment Fund (Budget 2016 provided $2 billion over three years, starting in 2016–17). The Department's authorities for 2018–19 increased as a result of new funding from Budget 2017 to support various programs, such as the Innovation Superclusters Initiative, Strategic Innovation Fund and Sustainable Development Technology Canada.

Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) 2015–16 Actual spending (authorities used)

Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations (1)

73,477,129

73,477,129

68,908,556

69,559,914

215,046,817

66,620,345

50,124,282

42,207,494

Marketplace Competition and Investments

41,903,401

41,903,401

41,209,734

40,569,081

43,078,858

45,359,615

41,153,360

46,107,684

Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Digital Economy (2)

98,327,554

98,327,554

90,667,780

89,897,757

108,138,900

112,498,906

98,326,709

117,906,335

Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity (3)

1,531,761,184

1,531,761,184

1,470,171,495

963,477,313

1,657,975,852

1,313,478,869

1,197,358,867

311,415,582

Industrial Research and Development Financing (4)

359,430,758

359,430,758

586,702,247

428,466,853

412,030,007

394,993,951

280,593,734

244,450,612

Small Business Research, Financing and Services

84,501,977

84,501,977

90,430,178

85,323,729

82,514,300

80,232,379

86,209,989

85,392,842

Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity

35,618,706

35,618,706

38,032,814

36,972,236

37,090,097

36,987,511

32,364,461

33,947,199

Community Economic Development (5)

213,105,186

213,105,186

352,222,148

264,067,978

221,867,323

124,776,980

146,688,614

156,421,933

Subtotal

2,438,125,895

2,438,125,895

2,738,344,951

1,978,334,862

2,777,742,154

2,174,948,556

1,932,820,016

1,037,849,681

Internal Services (6)

152,780,251

152,780,251

166,536,487

165,538,511

187,833,143

180,989,726

154,093,769

131,984,816

Total

2,590,906,146

2,590,906,146

2,904,881,438

2,143,873,373

2,965,575,297

2,355,938,282

2,086,913,785

1,169,834,497

Budgetary performance summary explanation

The Total Authorities Available for Use for this program in 2017–18 includes $169.5 million in unused authorities accumulated by CIPO since its creation in 1994. CIPO is an organization within the Department that is funded entirely from the revenues it generates, drawing from its unused authorities as required. The variance in Actual Spending for previous years is primarily due to a delay in the upgrades to CIPO's information technology infrastructure.

The variance between Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending is primarily due to new funding for the Public Safety Broadband Network and the Prime Minister's Teaching Awards, intellectual property royalties received, the reprofiling of funds from the 2014 and 2016 Federal Infrastructure Initiatives, internal realignments and the implementation of new collective agreements.

  1. The variance between Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending is primarily related to new funding for the Innovation Superclusters Initiative (some of which was unspent), Innovative Solutions Canada, Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), CanCode, Mitacs, the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and the Institute for Quantum Computing, as well as a reprofiling of funds for PSI-SIF to future years and a lapse by SDTC.
  2. The variance between Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending is primarily due to new funding received for SIF and the consolidation of the legacy programs, as well as a reprofiling of SADI funds from the previous year.
  3. The variance between 2017–18 Planned Spending and Actual Spending is primarily due to a reprofiling of $70.9 million for Connect to Innovate to future years and a lapse of $17.3 million for Connecting Canadians. The variance between 2015–16 Actual Spending and Planned Spending for future years reflects approved funding for the Connect to Innovate program.
  4. The variance between Planned Spending, Total Authorities and Actual Spending is due to additional funding received during the year, including the operating budget carry forward to support unfunded priorities and compensation adjustments as a result of collective bargaining.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Programs and Internal Services 2015–16 Actual full-time equivalents 2016–17 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents

Marketplace Frameworks and Regulations

1,729

1,743

1,801

1,769

1,835

1,843

Marketplace Competition and Investments

379

347

351

339

349

348

Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Digital Economy (1)

806

700

715

677

708

708

Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity (2)

68

101

98

117

125

124

Industrial Research and Development Financing (3)

73

48

50

52

56

56

Small Business Research, Financing and Services (4)

100

123

119

147

143

140

Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity (5)

235

220

210

231

237

237

Community Economic Development

119

109

114

116

108

108

Subtotal

3,509

3,391

3,458

3,448

3,561

3,564

Internal Services (6)

1,202

1,410

1,417

1,462

1,428

1,428

Total

4,711

4,801

4,875

4,910

4,989

4,992

Human resources summary explanation

  1. The variance between Planned and Actual FTEs is a result of a reduction in the program's activities, overestimated planned staffing and higher attrition than anticipated.
  2. The variance between Planned and Actual FTEs is related to new funding received for the implementation of the Innovation Superclusters Initiative.
  3. The variance between 2015–16 Actual FTEs and future years is mainly due to a change in requirements for how corporate services functions are reported. Previously, if corporate services functions were reported exclusively in the delivery of one program, they were reported as part of that program. New requirements mean all corporate services functions are reported under Internal Services.
  4. The variance between Planned and Actual FTEs is primarily related to the transfer of the Accelerated Growth Service to Innovation Canada and the creation of the Digital Transformation Service Sector.
  5. The variance between Planned and Actual FTEs is primarily due to the creation of the Economic Strategy Tables.
  6. The variance between Planned and Actual FTEs is primarily due to the creation of Innovation Canada and staffing delays related to an internal reorganization.

Expenditures by vote

For information on ISED's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017–2018. Footnote 31

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of ISED's spending with the Government of Canada's spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.xxx

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

ISED's financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018, are available on the departmental websiteFootnote 32.

Financial statements highlights

The financial results are shaped by the Department's programs and internal services that aim to help make Canada a world-leading centre for innovation, to help create better jobs, to strengthen and grow the middle class and to provide better opportunities for all Canadians.

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18
Planned results*
2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
Difference (2017–18 actual results minus 2017–18 planned) Difference (2017–18 actual results minus 2016–17 Actual results)
* As per the 2017–18 Future-Oriented Statement of Operations.

Total expenses

2,662,387,979

2,450,494,699

2,236,821,778

(211,893,280)

213,672,921

Total revenues

257,686,915

223,712,577

229,530,814

(33,974,338)

(5,818,237)

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

2,404,701,064

2,226,782,122

2,007,290,964

(177,918,942)

219,491,158

Planned Results

The $177.9 million net variance between the 2017–18 Planned Results and the 2017–18 Actual is primarily due to the reprofile of funding for existing Grants and Contributions programs, in particular, the Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund (PSI-SIF) and Connect to Innovate.

Expenses

Expenses by Type
Expenses by Type (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure: Expenses by Type
Expenses by Type
Transfer Payments Salaries and Employee Benefits Other Operating Expenditures
68% 23% 9%

Total expenses were $2.5 billion in 2017–18, an increase of $214 million from 2016–17. This variance is mainly attributable to increased spending for transfer payment programs such as the Strategic Aerospace Defence Initiative and the Canada Foundation for Innovation. Furthermore, salaries and employee benefits expenses increased due to collective agreements changes.

Revenues

Revenues by Type
Revenues by Type (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure: Revenues by Type
Revenues by Type
Radio Spectrum Licenses earned on behalf of Government Sales of services Other revenues
75% 21% 4%

Total gross revenues were $1.5 billion in 2017–18, an increase of $17.8 million from 2016–17, while net revenues of $223.7 million in 2017–18 increased by $5.8 million compared to the previous fiscal year. Revenues from fines account for the majority of the increase in gross revenue since last year. Revenues from spectrum licences represent the majority of gross reported revenue in the Departmental Financial Statements. It is reported as revenue earned on behalf of Government as it cannot be accessed by the Department. Sales of services represent legislative fees and registrations collected by organizations such as the Canadian Intellectual Property Office, the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy and the Canada Small Business Financing Program. A portion of these revenues is non-respendable and is reported as revenue earned on behalf of Government.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as at March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial Information 2017–18
2016–17 Difference
(2017–18 minus 2016–17)
Total net liabilities

907,364,535

946,520,309

(39,155,774)

Total net financial assets

424,606,106

420,220,966

4,385,140

Departmental net debt

482,758,429

526,299,343

(43,540,914)

Total non-financial assets

146,450,975

128,945,894

17,505,081

Departmental net financial position

(336,307,454)

(397,353,449)

61,045,995

Liabilities

Liabilities by Type
Liabilities by Type (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure: Liabilities by Type
Liabilities by Type
Deferred Revenue Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Allowance for loan guarantees Other Liabilities
90% 6% 3% 1%

Total gross liabilities were $8.1 billion for 2017–18, a decrease of $967.3 million year-over-year, while net liabilities were $907.4 million, a decrease of $39.2 million compared to 2016–17. The decrease in gross liabilities is mainly attributable to deferred revenues. There were no new spectrum auctions in 2017-18 and as a result, the recognition of revenue from previous year auctions resulted in a decrease of the liabilities. The majority (99%) of the deferred revenue cannot be accessed by ISED and is therefore reported as a liability held on behalf of Government.

Assets

Assets by Type
Assets by Type (the long description is located below the image)
Description of Figure: Assets by Type
Assets by Type
Due from CRF Loans Receivable held on behalf of Government Tangible Capital Assets Other
20% 70% 7% 3%

Total gross financial assets were $1.9 billion for 2017–18, a decrease of $195.5 million from 2016–17, while net financial assets were $424.6 million, an increase of $4.4 million year-over-year. The decrease in gross financial assets is primarily attributable to the repayment of unconditionally repayable contributions.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development:
The Honourable Navdeep Bains, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Science and Sport:
The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie:
The Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion:
The Honourable Mary Ng, P.C., M.P.

Institutional head:
John Knubley

Ministerial portfolio:
Innovation, Science and Economic DevelopmentFootnote 33

Enabling instrument:
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada's founding legislation is the Department of Industry Act, S.C. 1995, c.1.Footnote 34

Year of incorporation:
1892

Reporting framework

ISED's Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2017–18 are shown below.

Strategic Outcome: The Canadian marketplace is efficient and competitive

Program: Marketplace Frameworks and Regulation

Program: Marketplace Competition and Investments

Program: Spectrum, Telecommunications and the Digital Economy

Strategic Outcome: Advancements in science and technology, knowledge, and innovation strengthen the Canadian economy

Program: Science, Technology and Innovation Capacity

Program: Industrial Research and Development Financing

Strategic Outcome: Canadian businesses and communities are competitive

Program: Small Business Research, Financing and Services

Program: Industrial Competitiveness and Capacity

Program: Community Economic Development

Internal Services

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on lower‑level programs is available on the GC InfoBase.Footnote 35

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the ISED's websiteFootnote 36:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Footnote 37

This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Corporate Management Sector
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
235 Queen Street
2nd Floor, East Tower
Ottawa ON K1A 0H5

Email: ic.info-info.ic@canada.ca
Fax: 613-954-2340

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three‑year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical approach used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives. The "plus" in GBA+ acknowledges that the gender-based analysis goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability. Examples of GBA+ processes include using data disaggregated by sex, gender and other intersecting identity factors in performance analysis, and identifying any impacts of the program on diverse groups of people, with a view to adjusting these initiatives to make them more inclusive.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (structure de gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization's inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d'alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization's programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long‑term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time‑limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
Date modified: