Achievement Report 2009–2010: Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act


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Message from the Departmental Champion for Official Languages

As departmental Champion for Official languages, I am pleased to present Industry Canada's Achievement Report 2009–2010: Implementation of Section 41 of the Official Languages Act. This document summarizes Industry Canada's major achievements and highlights the initiatives undertaken by the Department's sectors and regional offices over the past year.

By virtue of section 41 of the Official Languages Act, Industry Canada is committed to enhancing the vitality and supporting the development of English and French linguistic minority communities and to fostering full recognition and use of both official languages in our country.

The Department remains steadfast in the promotion of Canada's linguistic duality and, as a result, Industry Canada staff across the country creatively support official languages through a variety of activities. We will maintain this thrust and our commitment to a strong partnership with the official language minority communities to ensure that they share in Canada's economic prosperity.

France Pégeot
Assistant Deputy Minister


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General Information

General Information
Federal institution
Website
Industry Canada
www.ic.gc.ca
Minister responsible The Honourable Tony Clement
Senior official responsible for implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act France Pégeot
Assistant Deputy Minister,
Regional Operations
Federal institution's general mandate Industry Canada's mandate is to help make Canadians more productive and competitive in the knowledge-based economy, thus improving the standard of living and quality of life in Canada.
National coordinator responsible for implementation of section 41
Full title
Telephone number
Email
Roda Muse
Manager, Economic Development
613-954-2783
roda.muse@canada.ca

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Summary

Awareness

In 2009-10, a number of Industry Canada celebrations highlighted the 40th anniversary of the Official Languages Act. This was also an opportunity to strengthen the measures implemented regarding the active offer of services to the public.

A growing trend has been the participation of official language minority communities (OLMCs) in Industry Canada's programs and services. This is partly the result of employees' increased awareness of the Department's official language obligations, as well as better promotion of programs and services. At each step of a program's development and subsequent delivery, sectors and branches can obtain advice on Part VII of the Official Languages Act from the OLMC Unit within Regional Operations. With this approach, FedNor, for example, approved 67 projects targeting OLMCs, worth approximately $3.8 million; this was up from 35 projects worth $1.9 million in 2008-09.

Steps were taken, which involved senior management, to understand the Supreme Court of Canada's February 2009 ruling in the case of DesRochers v. Canada (Industry)—known as the CALDECH decision—and its impact on the Implementation of Part VII of the Official Languages Act at Industry Canada. A working group representing the Department's key sectors was set up to carry out the follow-up and evaluation of the directives issued by the Treasury Board Secretariat's Chief Human Resources Officer.

In 2009-10, the Department made systematic use of the Official Languages Filter to analyze the impacts of new programs or policies on OLMCs. This is an indication of employees' high degree of awareness of section 41 of the Official Languages Act. Instances in which the Filter was used included Treasury Board submissions for the Knowledge Infrastructure Program (KIP) and the Marquee Tourism Events Program (MTEP).

Consultations

The Department initiated a number of targeted consultations among OLMCs in the Atlantic and Ontario regions. It also took part in the meetings of the National Human Resources Development Committees for Anglophone and Francophone linguistic minorities, and it led consultations among Francophone small and medium-sized enterprises on behalf of partners of the Economic Development Initiative (EDI) outlined in the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future.

Communications

The CommunAction website has been upgraded to meet the needs of developing OLMCs and stakeholders. The website provides OLMCs with quick and easy access to take part in Industry Canada and federal government economic development programs and services. Relationships with OLMCs have benefited from the Department's participation in various government and community events, such as exhibitions, annual general meetings and business meetings.

Coordination and liaison

Industry Canada has continued to coordinate the EDI implementation in cooperation with the regional development agencies. These liaison activities have made it possible to strengthen partnerships between the Department and the regional development agencies regarding the economic development of OLMCs.

The Department continues to contribute to the promotion of OLMCs by participating in a number of committees, such as the Coordinating Committee on Official Languages Research, the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages, Citizenship and Immigration Canada's Economic Working Group, the network of national coordinators responsible for the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act, and the Network of Departmental Official Languages Champions.

Funding and program delivery

In 2009-10, Industry Canada continued to support the economic development of OLMCs through its programs and services. The support has enabled OLMCs to benefit from programs implemented under Canada's Economic Action Plan. Through the KIP and other programs, the Department invested in 18 post-secondary institutions in OLMCs in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba. In partnership with federal economic development agencies and FedNor, Industry Canada has also implemented project funding activities related to the EDI. Under the Roadmap, the EDI seeks to foster the acquisition of business skills through innovation, entrepreneurship, partnerships and economic diversification in OLMCs.

Accountability

Industry Canada has continued its efforts to ensure that its policies and initiatives take OLMCs into consideration. The Department has worked on the development of performance indicators in cooperation with the regional development agencies responsible for implementing the EDI. It has cooperated on developing a risk management mechanism for implementing section 41 of the Official Languages Act, as required by the CALDECH decision.

Distribution

Industry Canada will advise the following stakeholders when its Achievement Report 2009-2010 is published on the Department's website:

  • national associations representing OLMCs, the Réseau de développement économique et d'employabilité and its members, the Fédération des communautés francophones et acadienne du Canada and its members, the Community Economic Development and Employability Corporation and its member committees, and the Quebec Community Groups Network and its members;
  • Canadian Heritage;
  • the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages;
  • the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages; and
  • the Standing Senate Committee on Official Languages.

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A

Awareness

Expected result

Creation of lasting changes in the Department's organizational culture. Employees and management are aware of and understand their responsibilities regarding section 41 of the Official Languages Act and official language minority communities (OLMCs).

Awareness
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result

Meetings of the Official Languages Discussion Network

General awareness-building activities (workshops, special events, articles in Bulletin 41–42 and This Week @ IC) carried out in partnership with the Communications and Marketing Branch, the Human Resources Branch and other units.

Communications and Marketing Branch  
Articles were published in This Week @ IC on bilingual telephone greetings, electronic communications and meetings and on the importance of the active offer of service. Employees were sensitized to the importance of providing services to the public in both official languages and communicating with clients in the official language of their choice. Formal communications conducted internally and externally are bilingual.
Regional Operations Sector  

Information sessions on section 41 were offered to increase program managers' awareness and understanding and to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Official Languages Act. Support for functional units helped them to meet their obligations under section 41 of the Official Languages Act.

Support for functional units helped them to meet their obligations under section 41 of the Official Languages Act

.
OLMCs are considered in the development and implementation of the Department's programs.
Activities of the Departmental Champion for Official Languages to make senior management and staff more aware of the relevance and benefits of linguistic duality and the Department's obligations under the Official Languages Act A departmental working group was established to implement the Supreme Court of Canada's decision on the CALDECH case. Increased consideration is being given to the impact of the Supreme Court's CALDECH decision.
  The Sector made a presentation to the Committee on Human Resources Strategic Policies about the impact of the CALDECH decision. Senior management agreed to the development of action plans, with the aim of improving areas that required attention.

An article appeared in Bulletin 41–42 (Canadian Heritage) about Industry Canada's achievements in providing support for OLMCs.

New Industry Canada employees participated in orientation sessions.

The Champion communicated regularly with departmental staff about active offer of services to the public.

 
FedNor
 
FedNor developed a policy concerning the application of official languages to a project or activity. The policy was communicated to employees and is being used as a tool to review new project applications. As employees gain familiarity with official language requirements, they become more proactive in considering official languages when they review projects.
Bi-monthly meetings were held.
 

An internal Economic Development Initiative (EDI) committee was set up to discuss the needs of OLMCs and proposed projects.

The senior management team sent an email on requirements of the Official Languages Act and the active offer of services.

Five people were originally designated to work on the EDI, but the responsibility is now shared among all bilingual staff. With so many ambassadors of the program, EDI updates are shared at all staff meetings.
Ontario Region
 

Awareness sessions were offered to management and staff on the topic of section 41 requirements within the region.

The Regional Executive Director's office produced corporate messages in English and French, promoting regular communications in the Region by staff. Tools were made available to assist all employees with the active offer of service.

Employees have better awareness and understanding of official language obligations.

Ongoing monitoring was conducted of bilingual offerings (website, phone service, etc.) and promotional materials.

All managers and employees received reminders about their obligations regarding the active offer of service.

Awareness sessions were held on roles and responsibilities for program management and service delivery.

Bilingual offices and personnel providing service to the public were clearly identified. A strategy was developed to fulfill official language obligations.

Tools were provided to assist employees with services to the public, including templates to develop bilingual email messages and telephone greetings.

Clients have more equitable access to government programs and services. Employees have greater awareness and understanding of departmental official language obligations.
Atlantic Region
 
An Active Offer session was held in June 2009 for all managers.

All community and regional Francophone newspapers are monitored.

Employees have increased their awareness of section 41 of the Official Languages Act.
Quebec Region
 
The Regional Executive Director's office regularly exchanged information with the Communications and Marketing Branch, which is responsible for liaising with OLMCs, headquarters and Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED-Q). A good understanding was achieved of the Quebec Region's role in supporting OLMCs.

The Region celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Official Languages Act.

Effective liaison services were established between the OLMCs, Quebec Region and CED-Q.

On September 10, 2009, a celebration of linguistic duality served to remind all employees in the Region of the importance of the Official Languages Act.

Employee interest has increased in the Official Languages Act.
Prairies and Northern Region
 

The Regional Executive Director tabled departmental performance results on official language requirements and active offer service for discussion at a Regional Management Team meeting on . The aim was to increase awareness, encourage directors to remind their managers/staff of official language requirements, and ensure compliance with the active offer of service.

The Regional Executive Director highlighted the 40th anniversary of the Official Languages Act in the November 2009 issue of the regional newsletter, Connections. The focus was on how the Act has evolved and had a positive influence on the public service.

The Manitoba Communications Advisor routinely forwards to all Winnipeg staff information bulletins provided by local Francophone organizations.

Employees have increased their awareness and understanding of official language requirements.
Small Business and Marketplace Services
 
Corporations Canada
Managers again encouraged employees to participate in departmental activities organized for the Semaine nationale de la francophonie.
 
Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy  
In November 2009, an organized event featured activities that sensitized employees to the importance of using both official languages in the workplace. One of the activities was a trivia game in both languages, with questions about the history of the Official Languages Act within the federal government.

Employees better understand section 41 of the Official Languages Act.

Both official languages are used increasingly in the workplace.


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B

Consultations

Expected result

Creation of lasting relationships between the Department and official language minority communities (OLMCs). The Department and OLMCs understand each other's needs and mandates.

Consultations
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result

Annual consultations with representatives of OLMCs

Participation in the work of consultative bodies organized by central agencies and other departments through government and representatives of OLMCs to discuss priorities and needs. These include the National Committee of Economic Development and Employability and the National Human Resources Development Committee for the English Linguistic Minority in Quebec

Regional Operations Sector  
Through the Réseau de development économique et d'employabilité (RDÉE Canada) and the Community Economic Development Corporation (CEDEC), Industry Canada held two consultations with small and medium-sized enterprises in OLMCs. The Department improved its understanding of realities and issues faced by small and medium-sized enterprises in OLMCs.
FedNor  
FedNor held meetings with OLMC organizations to understand their needs. Among these were:
  • RDÉE Canada, a national Francophone economic development network — 2 formal meetings and informal discussions
  • Association des Francophones du Nord-Ouest de l'Ontario — 3 meetings, February, June and November 2009
  • Club Canadien Français de Thunder Bay — 1 meeting, June 2009
  • Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Francophone Affairs Unit, West Campus, Thunder Bay —   meetings, June and September 2009
  • Regroupement des organismes francophones de Thunder Bay — 2 meetings, May and August 2009
  • Greenstone Economic Development Corporation (a Community Futures Development Corporation) — 2 meetings, April and June 2009
  • Centre Ontarien de prévention des agressions — 1 meeting, June 2009
  • Superior-Greenstone Community Inclusion — 1 meeting, August 2009
  • Municipality of Greenstone — 2 meetings, June and August 2009
  • Comité d'ajustement communautaire de Dubreuilville — monthly meetings
  • Comité d'ajustement communautaire du nord-ouest — 1 meeting, June 2009
  • Ontario Association of Community Futures Development Corporations, Diversity Committee — annual meeting and quarterly teleconferences
  • Northeast Development Network—1 meeting, October 2009
  • Committee of Northern Ontario departments and agencies, Kapuskasing — quarterly meetings
  • Council of Northern Ontario departments and agencies — 4 to 6 meetings annually
  • États généraux de la francophonie du Grand Sudbury — sectoral table on arts, culture and heritage (quarterly meetings) and sectoral table on the economy (3 meetings, October, November and December 2009)
  • Fédération de la jeunesse franco-ontarienne — 1 meeting, January 2010
  • Conseil scolaire catholique de district des Grandes Rivières (school board supervising the two Francophone secondary schools in the Temiskaming area) — 1 meeting, January 2010
  • Direction Ontario — several informal discussions
  • Jeux de la Francophonie du Grand Sudbury, 2011 — ongoing discussions about the event
  • Association canadienne-française de l'Ontario — meeting in the Temiskaming area, April 2009
  • Centre de santé communautaire du Témiskaming — informal discussions
  • International Plowing Match, Temiskaming, Francophone committee — formal and informal participation
  • Union des cultivateurs franco-ontariens — formal meeting, May 2009
  • Fédération de la jeunesse franco-ontarienne and North Claybelt Community Futures Development Corporation — workshop planning meeting, March 2010
  • Collège Boréal, Sudbury, New Liskeard and West Nipissing — informal discussions
  • Caisse populaire de Bonfield — informal meeting
  • Alliance de recherches universités communautés — formal meeting, November 2009
Consultations with OLMCs led to improved collaboration and increased understanding of shared concerns, including project development initiatives.
Ontario Region  
The Region engaged with Francophone business organizations and service delivery partners, including Femmes d'affaires et de développement économique rural, and Small Business Enterprise Centres. The aim was to identify the needs of the local Francophone business community. The Region also participated in outreach events that directly served the local Francophone business community — for example, Bridges to Better Business. The Canada-Ontario Business Service Centre played a key role in strengthening the participation of Franco-Ontarian entrepreneurs in local economies. It helped to improve understanding of their priorities and to identify the potential impacts of partner programs and services.
Atlantic Region  
The Atlantic Region implemented a robust outreach strategy that includes meetings with key stakeholders in OLMCs. The Region participated in several consultations, including:
  • the Section 41 Network
  • the Day of Reflection, celebrating 40 years of linguistic duality in New Brunswick, with the Commissioner of Official Languages, the Chief Human Resources Officer of the Treasury Board Secretariat, and the President of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency
Consultations with OLMC stakeholders in Atlantic Canada enable the Region to enhance cooperation and gain an improved understanding of mutual concerns. This in turn facilitates eventual project development initiatives with OLMCs.

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C

Communications

Expected result

The culture of official language minority communities (OLMCs) reflects a broad understanding of the Department's mandate. OLMCs receive up-to-date and relevant information about the Department's programs and services.

Communications
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result

Creation of a comprehensive Industry Canada communications and marketing plan

Targeted communications and marketing activities regarding the implementation of section 41 of the Official Languages Act

Updating of the Industry Canada CommunAction website

Regional Operations Sector  
The CommunAction website was updated. A survey by the Official Languages Secretariat outlined the relevance of the CommunAction website for information related to the Roadmap.
Ontario Region  

The Canada-Ontario Business Service Centre (COBSC) distributed bilingual information at "Business, Government Services and You" outreach events in Kitchener-Waterloo, Hamilton, Oshawa, Markham, Ottawa, Windsor, London and Sault Ste. Marie.

The COBSC distributed a quarterly bilingual newsletter to all its service delivery partners, including bilingual sites.

By distributing bilingual information, the COBSC strengthened partnerships with organizations serving entrepreneurs and raised awareness of its ability to offer services in both official languages.

The initiative increased outreach opportunities through government program partners with Francophone organizations at the community level.

Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO)  
CIPO offered sessions on Promotion of Intellectual Property (IP) Case Studies, as well as presentations on IP Basics to universities, colleges and organizations located in OLMCs. 181 French-speaking students located in OLMCs have a better knowledge of intellectual property.

French-language Case Studies sessions and IP Basics presentations were offered at the University of Ottawa, Université Sainte-Anne, Université de Moncton and New Brunswick Community College campuses.

English-language IP Basics presentations were offered at Trinity College in Gatineau and the Montreal Entrepreneurship Centre.

French-language IP Basics presentations were offered to companies via the Conseil de développement économique des municipalités bilingues du Manitoba and the Chambre de commerce francophone de Halifax.

CIPO was an exhibitor at Expocommerce in Pointe-de-l'Église, Nova Scotia, and also at the Congrès mondial acadien — Espace 2009, in Pokemouche, New Brunswick.

CIPO promoted its products and services while taking part in fairs or events to give OLMCs a better knowledge of intellectual property. For small and medium-sized enterprises located in OLMCs, it offered one- to two-hour individual IP information sessions.

25 Anglophone students in Gatineau and 30 Anglophone business people in Montréal have a better knowledge of intellectual property.

20 French-speaking business people in Manitoba and 12 Francophone companies in the Halifax area have a better knowledge of intellectual property, supporting better decision making.

677 business people or other participants from OLMCs have a better knowledge of the issues and advantages of intellectual property.

Small and medium-sized enterprises have a better knowledge of intellectual property and can make better strategic decisions. CIPO can better understand the intellectual property needs of small and medium-sized enterprises located in OLMCs.

Computers for Schools (CFS)  
The CFS website provides detailed and up-to-date information in both official languages for the benefit of linguistic minority communities. OLMCs are better informed on the CFS Program.
The Program's licensees manage CFS across Canada. They can provide OLMCs with information in both official languages through an established referral process implemented by Program headquarters. If an OLMC requires detailed information in either official language, CFS is now better able to respond.
Community Access Program (CAP)  
CAP factors OLMC considerations into its decision making on funding. It targets linguistic minority communities so that they can connect to the Internet and have an equal opportunity to fully participate in the knowledge-based economy. Each CAP recipient is required to provide services in both official languages either itself or by directing the OLMC to an alternative source. A clause in each CAP contribution agreement informs the recipient of the number of identified OLMCs in its jurisdiction. It also requests that the recipient provide services, promote the CAP website services and make all documentation available in both official languages.

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D

Coordination and Liaison

Expected result

Cooperation with multiple partners to enhance the development and vitality of official language minority communities (OLMCs), and to share best practices.

Coodination and Liaison
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result
Maintaining existing partnerships with other Government of Canada departments and agencies

Participation in interdepartmental committees and intergovernmental mechanisms on official languages issues, including the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages, the Council of the Network of Departmental Official Languages Champions and the Network of National Section 41 Coordinators
Regional Operations Sector  

The Sector participated in various interdepartmental committees, including the National Human Resources Development Committees for Anglophone and Francophone linguistic minorities, the Interdepartmental Research Committee on Community Economic Development, and the Network of National Section 41 Coordinators.

The Official Languages Champion and Co-Champion participated in various committees, such as the Committee of the Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages and the Network of Departmental Official Languages Champions.

The Sector's activities increased information about OLMCs, fostered good practices within the communities and promoted knowledge-sharing on them. The result is improved programming and services for OLMCs.
FedNor  
Employees participated in several committees and working groups:
  • National Economic Development Initiative coordinators — monthly meetings
  • Network of National Section 41 Coordinators
  • Interdepartmental Management Committee for the Official Languages Program
  • Committee of Northern Ontario departments and agencies — 4 meetings in 2009, 1 meeting in 2010
  • CALDECH working group — 2 meetings
  • Human Resources and Skills Development Canada — Provincial Interdepartmental Committee on Immigration
With greater understanding of the issues, FedNor has been able to collaborate on potential solutions and share best practices with other institutions.
Ontarion Region  

The Canada-Ontario Business Service Centre (COBSC) coordinated "Business, Government Services and You" outreach events in collaboration with Small Business Enterprise Centres in Kitchener-Waterloo, Hamilton, Oshawa, Markham, Ottawa, Windsor, London and Sault Ste. Marie.

Coordination facilitated the participation of government partners. The result was greater awareness of government programs and services available to entrepreneurs.

Partners received up-to-date, relevant information about COBSC programs and services in English and French.

The outreach events give more French-speaking entrepreneurs access to important information on government services and programs that can assist them. In addition, the events strengthen partnerships with organizations serving entrepreneurs and increase awareness that COBSC offers services in both official languages.
Atlantic Region  

The Atlantic Region continues to work and liaise with industry associations and other OLMC networks across the four Atlantic provinces. The aim is to build relationships, raise awareness and facilitate discussion on programs and services.

For example, the Atlantic Region is a supporter of Avancement pédagogique des technologies de l'information et de la communication en Atlantique. Staff members attend events and meetings with this organization.

 
Prairies and Northern Region  
A representative from Human Resources Winnipeg sits on the Manitoba Interdepartmental Network of Official Languages Coordinators.  
Quebec Region  
The Region maintains liaison services between OLMCs, Industry Canada headquarters and Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions (CED-Q).  
In the capacity of Departmental Official Languages Co-Champion, the Regional Executive Director attended the Network of Departmental Official Languages Champions meeting on June 18 and 19, 2009, in Kingston, as well as the annual Official Languages Good Practices Forum. The Official Languages Network Committee (part of Industry Canada's Regional Operations Sector) serves as a forum for in-depth discussions on the importance of supporting OLMCs.
The Region used telephone and email communication to meet the periodic needs of OLMCs. For example, the Region ensured continued federal representation on the Québec Multilingual Committee of the Québec Chamber of Commerce. The result was that Canada Economic Development continued to participate in the Committee. The federal government has an active presence in some OLMC projects and initiatives. For example, on the Québec Multilingual Committee, Canada Economic Development's participation makes it possible to continue with certain initiatives undertaken in previous years with the help of Industry Canada. The Committee's action plan called for the hiring of a coordinator, for which CED-Q provided the requisite support. Another element of the Committee's action plan, a linguistic best practices guide, is in development.
Economic Development Initiative (EDI) Regional Operations Sector  
Liaison with regional development agencies on the planning and execution of the EDI The Sector coordinated EDI initiatives with partners through regular meetings and information sharing.

Best practices are increasingly shared.

Management and reporting processes have been strengthened.

The Sector participates in the Roadmap for Canada's Linguistic Duality committees, such as the Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages, the Interdepartmental Policy Committee, the Interdepartmental Management Committee for the Official Languages Program, and the Coordinating Committee on Official Languages Research.


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E

Funding and Program Delivery

Expected result

Official language minority communities (OLMCs) are part of the Department's regular clientele, and have adequate access to its programs and services. OLMC needs (e.g., geographic dispersion and development opportunities) are taken into account.

Funding and Program Delivery
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result
Provision of information, services and funding to OLMCs through Industry Canada programs Community Access Program (CAP)  

Overall, in 2009-10, the Program supported 980 sites in OLMCs across Canada.

CAP has 81 networks across the country, providing representation and service for the majority of OLMCs. With their many projects, research activities, training and employment opportunities, and other activities, the networks contribute to the economic development of communities across the country, including OLMCs.

CAP funding has strengthened partnerships with OLMCs. The result is that the needs of Francophone communities are better met.

CAP and the Computers for Schools Program provide financial assistance to OLMCs.

Computers for Schools (CFS)  
CFS provides funding to not-for-profit organizations that, in turn, assist with program delivery across Canada on behalf of Industry Canada. In 2009-10, CFS provided a total of 3687 computers to OLMCs across Canada. The ability to record OLMC-related data has been enhanced.
FedNor  

FedNor delivered the following programs in 2009–10:

  • Northern Ontario Development Program
  • Community Futures Development Corporations
  • Economic Development Initiative
  • Community Adjustment Fund—Budget 2009 initiative

In 2009-10, 67 of the 313 projects approved (21%) benefited the Francophone community. This was a sharp increase from 2008-09, when 35 of the 319 projects approved (close to 11%) benefited Francophones.

The Northern Ontario Development Program invested $1.6 million in Francophone communities in 2009-10, up from $466 453 in 2007-08 and $1.5 million in 2008-09.

FedNor continued to provide additional funding to Community Futures Development Corporations, specifically in support of official language requirements.

Twenty-three communities in Northern Ontario (census subdivisions) benefited from projects directly supporting OLMCs.

Funding and support for OLMCs in Northern Ontario has increased.
Atlantic Region  

The Region provided funding to OLMC organizations, including Avancement pédagogique des technologies de l'information et de la communication en Atlantique.

The Department is also a member of various Francophone organizations and societies.

The Region has increased its ability to plan and organize an Atlantic-wide Francophone event focusing on science and technology.
Quebec Region  
While the Quebec Region has no funding dedicated to OLMCs, it liaises with OLMCs to offer expert advice as required. OLMCs have a better understanding of the programs and services available to their members.

The Region hired consultants to conduct two studies in spring 2008, yielding results that remain useful for medium- and long-term projects in OLMCs:

  • partnership projects and needs analysis in language training to improve employee bilingualism in Québec City and surrounding areas
  • Business and Community Vitality Index Model

The Quebec Region provides advisory services to OLMCs. For instance, the Region was able to refer the Community Economic Development and Employability Corporation of Laval-Laurentides-Lanaudière to Canada Economic Development for a collaborative project with the Community Futures Development Corporations.

The Region implements recommendations and suggestions stemming from research conducted on Industry Canada's behalf. An example is the creation of a linguistic best practices guide by the Québec Multilingual Committee.

The Region participated in a planning exercise financed by the OLMC Unit of the Regional Operations Sector under the Economic Development Initiative. The project applied the Business Vitality Index model to the community of Campbell's Bay in the Outaouais.

The Business Vitality Index Model gives English-speaking communities in Quebec an analysis model enabling them to themselves ensure community vitality.
Small Business and Marketplace Services Sector  
Small Business and Tourism Branch  
The Small Business Internship Program awarded a $46 000 contribution to the Prescott-Russell Community Development Corporation, located in an Eastern Ontario OLMC. The contribution has enabled a minority community to participate in the Internship Program.
Marquee Tourism Events Program  
The Program assists existing marquee tourism events to deliver enhanced world-class programs and experiences, thereby increasing or sustaining the number of tourists from within and outside Canada. The year 2009-10 was the first of a two-year program under Canada's Economic Action Plan. OLMCs had the opportunity to apply and receive funding under the Marquee Tourism Events Program. Of the 60 events funded in the year, 3 were in OLMCs. The Program provided financial assistance to OLMCs under Canada's Economic Action Plan.
Science and Innovation Sector  
The Knowledge Infrastructure Program (KIP), announced in Budget 2009, provides up to $2 billion in funding for deferred maintenance and repair projects at post-secondary institutions. In developing the terms and conditions for the program's delivery, Industry Canada used the Department's Official Languages Filter to examine the impact of the initiative on OLMCs. Both universities and colleges offering services in OLMCs received a percentage of KIP funding in excess of the population percentage of minority Anglophone and Francophone communities in the Canadian population as a whole (based on either mother tongue or first language spoken at home), according to the 2001 Census. KIP provided $165 million or 8.37% of its funding to minority communities, while the Census found that 4.59% of Canadians use a minority official language most frequently at home. KIP featured the involvement of provincial and territorial governments, as well as the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada and the Association of Canadian Community Colleges. Their participation ensured that all institutions, including universities and colleges specifically serving OLMCs, had the opportunity to apply for program funding. While service to OLMCs was not a formal criterion for project selection, the communities were included in the assessment phase.
Economic Development Initiative (EDI) FedNor  

Initiative funding for OLMCs throughout Ontario delivered by FedNor through the Northern Ontario Development Program

Industry Canada and the regional development agencies will lead a coordinated research effort on OLMCs' economic development. This will include an economic framework policy for OLMCs

Through the EDI, 39 projects were approved in 2009-10, resulting in investments of more than $2 million.

The needs of OLMCs are addressed through EDI.

Thirty-nine projects were developed.

Official Languages Unit  
The Unit developed a research strategy and plan on behalf of the EDI partners. Features included:
  • development of a research plan
  • monograph on OLMC economic development research
  • targeted consultation with Francophone entrepreneurs across Canada
  • purchase of socio-economic data from Statistics Canada
  • with Statistics Canada, development of a conceptual framework for OLMCs' socio-economic development
  • assessment of the research plan
  • conducting of an OLMC socio-economic analysis, based on the 2006 Census
  • joint projects of Industry Canada and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada: promoting OLMC participation in the knowledge-based economy; case study on economic self-determination
  • Business Vitality Index—training material for trainers and Campbell's Bay assessment
  • targeted consultations with Anglophone small and medium-sized enterprises in Quebec
  • economic integration services for Francophone immigrants in OLMCs
Studies and reports contribute to a better understanding of community planning.

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F

Accountability

Expected result

Full integration of the perspective of official language minority communities (OLMCs) and section 41 of the Official Languages Act into the Department's policies, programs and services. The reporting structure, internal evaluations and policy reviews determine how to better integrate OLMCs' perspective.

Accountability
Activities carried out to achieve the expected result Outputs Progress made in achieving the expected result

Presentation of key achievements related to the implementation of section 41 in annual reporting documents

Assessment of the impact of Industry Canada's performance in meeting the requirements of section 41

Regional Operations Sector  

The 2009-10 Achievement Report was produced and distributed.

A working committee was established to deal with the CALDECH decision follow-up.

The Sector provided the departmental contribution for the Scorecard of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

The Sector contributed to the official languages quantitative review.

Indicators are better used to assess section 41 implementation.

Tools are available to manage the risks related to official languages.

The Department increased its teamwork capacity to take into account OLMC needs and report accordingly.

FedNor  

Using target group indicators, FedNor continues to collect information on activities within the Francophone population of Northern Ontario.

OLMC needs and current activities are better understood.

FedNor began reviewing the official language action plan for Community Futures Development Corporations.

FedNor developed a new internal policy regarding the application of official languages to a project or activity.

This activity is under way. It is expected to offer better support to Community Futures Development Corporations so that they can meet the requirements for official languages and reporting.

The OLMC perspective continues to be present in FedNor planning. As called for in FedNor's business plan, the following activities were implemented:

  • FedNor continued liaison with OLMCs through existing national, provincial and regional forums.
  • FedNor required designated bilingual Community Futures Development Corporations to provide services of equal quality in both official languages, and to consider the needs and priorities of OLMCs in their action plans.

As FedNor creates more awareness among management and staff, it becomes more natural to look at activities and projects from an OLMC perspective.

Official language clauses in contribution agreements are currently being reviewed with the support of Industry Canada's Legal Services.

Consistent language is expected to lead to clearer expectations.

Ontario Region  

Senior managers' performance accords reflect commitments related to compliance with official language policies. The executive director and senior managers are accountable for their performance relating to official language obligations.

Official language concerns are integrated into strategic planning for sectors and regions, ensuring bilingual capacity where required.

The Region reviewed management practices to ensure understanding and adherence to official language obligations.

Official language commitments have been successfully implemented, as called for in the performance accords.

Economic Development Initiative (EDI) Regional Operations Sector  

Work with the regional development agencies in summarizing performance data to create a twice-yearly report on the execution of the EDI.

The Sector coordinated the development of the intermediate and final performance results and indicators for EDI within the Roadmap.

Reporting on EDI was timely.

The Sector collaborated with the regional development agencies to collect information for reporting purposes.

An evaluation of the EDI started in August 2010.

  FedNor  

Work with FedNor and the regional development agencies to establish performance indicators and evaluate the execution and effects of the EDI, using the scheduled evaluations of the programs through which the EDI has been implemented

The EDI falls under the terms and conditions of the Northern Ontario Development Program. Previous evaluations have shown that the Program has had a positive impact on the Francophone population (summative evaluation, 2006). Past evaluations have also shown that the Program's current terms and conditions are effective. FedNor has previously funded a number of Francophone-related projects under the Northern Ontario Development Program and the Community Futures program, and these have been successful in achieving results.

 
  Audit and Evaluation  
 

Branch representatives attended the EDI for OLMC meetings throughout the year.

The Branch provided advice and guidance on how to evaluate the performance of the EDI.

Advice, guidance and evaluation will improve understanding of how best to serve the needs of OLMCs.

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